Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello All
My dad has had some car trouble lately(his van died). So being the good son I lent him my tow vehicle (84 chevy 6.2 Deisel)and told him to keep it for however long he needed. Well He has had it now for 3 years!!! Not really a problem I use it whenever I need. UNTIL TODAY!!!! I went to haul some materials, and this thing is smoking like I was fogging for mosquitos whenever I lean into the throttle!! It used to smoke on start up and thats it. It is blowing Oil smoke. I am sure of that and It falls flat in its face on the highway if I mash the pedal down or even going up a grade. I had the injection pump rebuilt right after I "gave" it to him. His comment is that he didn't notice anything.(he never does,thats why he has car trouble in the first place I guess).I checked all the fluids.(OK) and he has been changing the oil regularly. Someone please tell me its something simple!!! I am just freaking, the weather is finally breaking, the Combat Rat is finally running , NOW THIS! Thanks for any help

Milan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
467 Posts
Has it been used on a lot of small/short trips? If so it's probably built up a lot of carbon deposits on the valves and heads. It will have lost some power too if this is the case, but it takes some time to build up a lot carbon and you may not have noticed the power decrease.

I have owned a few diesel powered cars and they tend to build up these carbon deposits after a while when used on shorter trips a lot, like a daily commute to work. When I went on vacation and drove a very long trip (500-600 miles) the car always ran a lot better, smoother and more powerfull. Fuel economy was better and it smoked a lott less. They told me the engine gets at a higher operating temperature during long trips and starts burning off the carbon deposits.

Another possiblity is worn fuel injectors. You can have these checked. They are usually not that expensive to replace. How many miles are on the enine?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
The old 6.2.......we had them as shop trucks and got rid of them quickly. One thing you can do to clear out some of the carbon is find something to close off the exhaust with the engine running at a good steady rpm above idle then unplug it and run away from the bib puff of smoke.

In the military we would use a broom to push down the exhaust flaps on our generators when we could not load bank them in the field......diesels need a load on them and short grocery store runs and not waiting on the glow plugs will cause all kinds of problems later.


Worth a shot before you start spending money.....just rev that sucker up and then block it off however you can (it will be hard) then wait just about 30 seconds then get back or get covered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
My dad drives about 2-5 miles a day and once a week he gets on the highway for about 1/2 hr of driving? Is there an "over the counter" way to clean the carbon?

Thanks
Milan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
I'm sure there is but not sure how much it will help. Something else that happens is the injector nossles get caked with carbon also and my be where a lot of your power loss is.


This stuff happens to big rigs too.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,143 Posts
Are you having to add oil?
Try an additive, there's nothing to lose. check with a local truck stop or where you had the injection rebuilt for some additive.

I'm amazed your truck is still running, I've seen a lot of those die over the years, they don't have a very good reputation. Maybe a lot of it is undeserved.
David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Maybe I shouldnt be too hard on pops then. I suggested he take it to a shop that deals with Diesels exclusively
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,143 Posts
Step one would be to replace the air filter and fuel filter/s before bringing it to a shop. Any reduction of air or fuel would cause loss of power.
The smoking, - I don't believe would be related to the injection pump but might be caused by clogged injectors. A poor spray pattern might cause smoking but I've seen a lot of stuff on the farm go wrong but the only smoking I've ever seen was either oil smoke or low compression related.
I've seen carboned up injector tips but the engine missed, not smoked. The Roosa Master injection pumps (which you probably have) usually peter out or the governer causes the engine to run erratic and not idle or rev right.

Check your engine vent tube for blowby. If it vents to the air intake, watch out! Diesel engines can run on their own blowby and since there is no throttle butterflies in the intake, the engine will rev till it runs out of oil.
I saw a VW Rabbit diesel do that, and that thing smoked till you couldn't see the car!

It usually takes a full throttle opening on a pretty shot engine with the crankcase vent entering the intake to make this happen, but I heard of one Oldsmobile diesel doing this.
David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
check the turbine inside the turbocharger to make sure it hasn't stuck, on my irrigation diesels that aren't ran very often I have this problem, you may be able to loosen the exhaust-turbocharger clamp & spin the turbine with a screwdriver or either spray wd-40 in, either way it needs to turn freely
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,728 Posts
Check the air cleaner element; folks tend to forget that diesels aren't throttled like gas engines, and suck a constant high volume of air. A dirty air cleaner element will cause the same symptoms you describe.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top