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That is the drain for GMs version of a catch can. You can get a plug for it or there are several aftermarket alternatives. Mighty Mouse for one.

Don
 

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Is the stock catch can going to work with your accessory drive? Are you using the stock accessory drive?
 

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I think any swap system will require an oil pan change and it’s unlikely anyone else’s mounts would clear that drain tube. Similarly I am pretty sure any aftermarket accessory drive will not clear the GM catch can because you are adding a power steering pump that is not on the stock GM accessory drive.

Gotta pay to play Patrick…

Don
 
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I am not sure that the catch can is a simple can. Somewhere in the system are check/PCV valve(s). I recommend the Holley part, this is no place for experimentation imho. Bad things can happen in supercharged engines if they are not properly vented.

I was able to use the stock LT truck pan but it was a truck build with a lot of ground clearance.

Don
 

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So you think the plastic box is not hollow? I was hoping that what I am calling a check valve, that is inside the oil pan, was acting like a PCV valve. Allright, I will spend the money.
Ya it could be. Point was to make sure before you start improvising and inventing. :) Maybe there is baffles in it, don’t know.

Don
 

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Thanks for the help. Do you know that I am cheap? I am stroking out over a $70.00 catch can. $230.00 for a hose would send me to the hospital.

Hmmm. Those brackets you mentioned fit a LT engine?
No they do not.
 

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The original oil pan holds 10 quarts of oil. The Holley and Top Street Performance pans both hold 6.1 quarts. I guess I need a huge external oil cooler to make up the difference. The aftermarket pans both have the dipstick on the driver side. The original has it on the passenger side. A new dip stick is required.

The original oil pan has an oil temperature sensor. The orange pentagon encompasses the connection. The aftermarket does not have a hole drilled in the pan.


View attachment 290104


I am not complaining. This is what I like about this project.

I really need a new oil pan. The original one is too low. If I run over a Nutria Rat, I could flip the car.
Pretty sure that is an oil level sensor. You dont need it.
Don
 

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I really appreciate the offer.

The thin wall tubing is 5/8" outside diameter and a magnet will stick to it. One of the end fittings looks like it was either soldered or brazed onto the tube. I heated it until it was a dull red color, and I still could not get the fitting to separate. After my futile attempt, I laughed at myself thinking GM used expensive silver solder to join the fitting to the tube.

Installing an aluminum -AN fitting on a steel tube might invite corrosion.

These are some of the reasons why I call it an interesting piece of junk. Why did GM route the tube between the block and motor mount? They could have run it above or below the motor mount.

The oil pan should arrive today. I have some ideas how to fix this PCV problem. I will post some photos if it works. So far, no JB weld or duct tape is in the plan.

Thanks again.
The ZL1 Camaro does not use plate style swap motor mounts. :) They are completely different and there is no interference with the tube.

You can see details of the factory mounts here

Don
 
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I removed the water pump and the stock catch can. I shook the catch can and it does not rattle. It is baffled. I can see a metal plate if I look down the large top hole.

It has a lot of bends in the plastic on the front side. This would be hard to recreate at home.

View attachment 290374

The bottom part has the special fitting for the hose that goes to the oil pan. It is mounted at an angle.

View attachment 290375


The engine was shipped full of oil. I glad I did not spin it upside down on the engine stand.

View attachment 290376


Here is a closeup of the check valve that is screwed into the oil pan. It is normally open. The ball would have to travel up to close the orifice.

View attachment 290377





View attachment 290378







View attachment 290379
The purpose of the check valve is to allow the catch can to drain when the car is not running. Engine vacuum will keep the valve closed when the car is running. At least this is my understanding.

Don
 

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I think there is another check valve where the hose connects to the intake manifold. More of a conventional PCV valve.

Later LS engines used small diameter orifice tubes in the valve covers instead of PCV valves afaik. Crankcase ventilation and resulting oil consumption was a bit of a cluster on early LS engines.

Don
 

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Mr. Don Hutton formerly known as Mr. Dutton,

This is from my connect and cruise manual:

Crankcase Ventilation System Description (LT4)
A positive crankcase ventilation system is used in order to provide a more complete scavenging of crankcase vapors.
Filtered air from the air induction system duct is supplied to the crankcase, mixed with blow-by vapors, and passes through a crankcase ventilation metering device before entering the supercharger. The primary component in the positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system is the PCV flow metering device (valve or orifice). Vacuum changes within the supercharger result in flow variations of the blow-by vapors. If abnormal operating conditions occur, the design of the PCV system permits excessive amounts of blow-by vapors to back flow through the crankcase vent tube and into the engine induction system to be consumed during normal combustion. This engine ventilation system design minimizes oil consumption and significantly reduces the potential for oil ingestion during vehicle limit handling maneuvers. The LT4 engine utilizes an integral positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system which is located in the Valve Lifter Oil Manifold Assembly beneath the Supercharger Assembly.
The Valve Lifter Oil Manifold Assembly contains composite oil separating baffles and PCV plumbing. Filtered fresh air is routed from upstream of the throttle plate to the engine oil tank where it mixes with crankcase gasses and is passed to both engine rocker arm covers. The rocker arm covers’ design shields rocker arm oil spray, thereby reducing the potential for oil being drawn back into the tank during backflow of the ventilation system. Blow-by vapors are routed from the valve lifter oil manifold assembly through a fixed orifice (7.5 mm) within a steel PCV tube, then into the underside of the supercharger near the front of the valve lifter oil manifold assembly.
The following parts maybe purchased to assist in PCV connection, see figure 4. The system must supply filtered air to the PCV system. Connection must be between the Mass Air Flow meter and the throttle body.

Tube-PCV (1) 12644356
Tube-PCV (2) 12668976
Tube-PCV (3) 12647125
Good info! Why didn’t you read the manual in the first place? :)

Don
 
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