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On hot days when my bigblock gets up to temp, it does not start. It's not all the time, just occasionally. When it does it, I don't even get a click out of the starter. If I wait 15 minutes, it starts right up. Is this a case of a starter issue or just excessive heat from the headers on the starter that could be answered with an insulator wrap on the starter? Thanks for any feedback.
 

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The old Chevy hot no start story again. I've had lots of Chevys and never had this problem. You need good fat battery cables, good grounds, and a good starter. The stock high torque type GM starters will work fine if you get a decent one. Most of the stuff from Autozone and the like is junk. I have the Jegs version of that starter on my Camaro, no heat shield, battery in trunk, 1/0 gauge cables, and it cranks just fine hot.
 

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The old Chevy hot no start story again. I've had lots of Chevys and never had this problem. You need good fat battery cables, good grounds, and a good starter. The stock high torque type GM starters will work fine if you get a decent one. Most of the stuff from Autozone and the like is junk. I have the Jegs version of that starter on my Camaro, no heat shield, battery in trunk, 1/0 gauge cables, and it cranks just fine hot.

Well, it's the original BBC starter, cables, etc from 69. I picked up a Thermotec starter wrap today to try. We will see if that does the trick.
 

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Besides a heat soak issue, you may have a bad connection somewhere in your electrical system that is heating up and creating enough resistance that the starter won't engage. The old heat soak problem is a common diagnosis - heat from the headers heats up the solenoid, increases it's internal resistance and prevents the starter from engaging. So it seems obvious that the longer the car runs, the longer the headers cook the starter solenoid and the worse the no-start-when-hot issue becomes. But when you think about it, any bad connection in the electrical system's primary voltage circuit will act the same way. The longer the car runs, the longer current flows through the primary circuit (and the bad connection) and the more heat (and more resistance) develops.

Use a digital volt-ohm meter (DVM) to measure from the battery (+) to the starter solenoid (S) wire while a helper cranks it. If you see less than 0.05V drop on the meter everything between the battery and the starter 'S' terminal is good. Repeat the test on the ground measuring between the battery (-) and the starter / solenoid shell while having a helper crank it. Less than 0.05V tells you everything in both the hot and ground circuits is in good shape and you probably have a heat soak issue.

If either test shows significantly more than 0.05V, you've isolated a circuit branch with a bad connection. You can use the same voltage drop measuriing technique to isolate the exact component. For example, measuring between the incoming power connection and IGN terminal on an ignition switch with the ignition on or engine running will verify the IGN contacts inside the switch. Measuring the drop on a wire that passes through the firewall bulkhead connector will verify the connection between the outer and inner half of the connection.

But start big as I describe in the first paragraph measuring from the battery to the load point. That will tell you whether further voltage drop measurements are warranted or if it's time to spend some coin on a new starter / solenoid.
 
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