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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just started to drive my 68 after a long rebuild.
I took it out yesterday in stop-start traffic.
The temp gauge (autometer) got to about 210 sometimes.
Is this too hot?

I have a 383 stroker with 10.3 compression. Trans is T350
Radiator has been checked and flushed, thermostat is 180.
I have a clutch fan and shroud with an electric fan as back up.
 

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I had similar issues, and went to a 165 thermostat as a result. This spring I've been running right at that 165 mark (hwy and all), but once the summer hits, I know I'll be in the 180-200 ballpark again.

I think that 210 is OK, but starting to get out of the "comfort zone", especially if running long periods of time at that temp...if you hit 220, shut her down!
 

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X2 Above... Are you using a thermal or non-thermal clutch fan.. I had changed over to a non-thermal clutch fan and at idle all day it pulls air.
 

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Are you using the small block radiator, or the big block radiator? Aluminum or factory? I changed to a aftermarket aluminum big block radiator, with two 1.25" cores, with hi flow water pump after building my engine up. It used to run right at 200-210 all the time, and overheat when I idled for even a few minutes in the summer.
Now it runs around 170, and when I idle for long periods it gets up around 190 degrees.
 

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I had similar issues, and went to a 165 thermostat as a result. This spring I've been running right at that 165 mark (hwy and all), but once the summer hits, I know I'll be in the 180-200 ballpark again.

I think that 210 is OK, but starting to get out of the "comfort zone", especially if running long periods of time at that temp...if you hit 220, shut her down!
Not great advice Keith. A lower t stat only gives you a head start. It will still exceed you cooling systems capacity with given time. 210 is certainly not ideal for your fuel system but won't hurt your engine. In fact, it's probably safer as long as you run the proper viscosity for that oil temp. You need to look at you cooling fan setup and make changes to improve your current system or get a more efficient radiator.
 

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If you look at gagues the red zone doesnt usually start till at least 250. Water boils at 220 normally. But not in your cooling system. Antifreze raises waters boiling point. So does pressure. Your system should not boil untill more than 250. If it does then you have a leak, and your mixture very poor. If you want it to run cooler than you need to upgrade.
 

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In a closed system with a 16 lb cap, water/coolant will boil at 260°F.

As long as the coolant system does not boil over, you're good to go. Just make sure the rest of the sytem is up for it, the fan, radiator, hoses, belts, and most important, engine oil.
 

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You said elec fan for backup? Do you have 2 fans? The elec. fan might be in the way of your clutch fan doing its job. Snap a pic of your setup for us. A pic is worth a 1000 words of trying to explain what you are seeing under the hood.
 

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I had similar issues, and went to a 165 thermostat as a result.
1/ The thermostat doesnt effect overall temps it just warms up the car faster and maintians min temp....
2/ Normal running temps are in the 180 to 195 range
3/ The std system is WAY overbuilt. There is no need for electic fans if you have shrouds etc.
4/A new engine the radiator should have the cores manually cleaned....like putting in a new oil pump ...I will lay odds that using the old radiator it has some blocked cores and some partly blocked..then with the new engine there are a few bits of gasket goo and crap broken off and now blocking a few of the partly blocked cores
This is very common

5/ The factory idoit light turns on at 235 deg
6/The electric fans, depending on what they are set to cut in at, will cause restriction to the air flow at low car speeds.
 

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I have just started to drive my 68 after a long rebuild.
I took it out yesterday in stop-start traffic.
The temp gauge (autometer) got to about 210 sometimes.
Is this too hot?

I have a 383 stroker with 10.3 compression. Trans is T350
Radiator has been checked and flushed, thermostat is 180.
I have a clutch fan and shroud with an electric fan as back up.
210 isn't time to panic yet.

Newer cars with computer controlled fans don't even turn on until 220+.
 

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Not great advice Keith. A lower t stat only gives you a head start. It will still exceed you cooling systems capacity with given time. 210 is certainly not ideal for your fuel system but won't hurt your engine. In fact, it's probably safer as long as you run the proper viscosity for that oil temp. You need to look at you cooling fan setup and make changes to improve your current system or get a more efficient radiator.
My cooling set up for my 383 small block is a big block 4 core radiator, shroud and flex fan...before my flex fan gets blamed for my woes, I had the same issues when I was running the clutch fan as well...

In the summer time, the thing (ever since the radiator was brand new) always ran north of 200 degress (with a 180 thermostat)...

Of course, I was running a TH400 trans through the raditor and a tranny cooler in front of that...wonder if bouncing back to a 180 now that I am running a manual trans will do the trick?

Thoughts? I am not worried about a 200 operating temp, but sure would love to stay right at the 180 mark...
 

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it's too hot when it boils over and when you start getting a lot of preignition. up to that point, the extra heat helps to get a more complete burn, which means better gas mileage.
 

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Thoughts? I am not worried about a 200 operating temp, but sure would love to stay right at the 180 mark...
So how long has it been since you have had the cores cleaned ?
Have you checked the coils in the bottom hose?
How many bottom hoses been replaced on that raditor?
Taken the stop **** out and with a bit of wire had a fish around in there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You said elec fan for backup? Do you have 2 fans? The elec. fan might be in the way of your clutch fan doing its job. Snap a pic of your setup for us. A pic is worth a 1000 words of trying to explain what you are seeing under the hood.
Yep, I have 2 fans.
Thermal clutch, crank driven and an electric fan (I hope you cansee what I mean in the photo)
Oh, and the radiator cap is a 15lb



Here's a pic of the radiator and shroud.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So how long has it been since you have had the cores cleaned ?
Have you checked the coils in the bottom hose?
How many bottom hoses been replaced on that raditor?
Taken the stop **** out and with a bit of wire had a fish around in there?
Core was flushed about 4 months ago and I only driven about 50 miles so far (since rebuild)
All hoses are new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
My cooling set up for my 383 small block is a big block 4 core radiator, shroud and flex fan...before my flex fan gets blamed for my woes, I had the same issues when I was running the clutch fan as well...

In the summer time, the thing (ever since the radiator was brand new) always ran north of 200 degress (with a 180 thermostat)...

Of course, I was running a TH400 trans through the raditor and a tranny cooler in front of that...wonder if bouncing back to a 180 now that I am running a manual trans will do the trick?

Thoughts? I am not worried about a 200 operating temp, but sure would love to stay right at the 180 mark...
I have the trans lines running into the radiator as well.
Would it run cooler with an independent trans cooler?
 
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