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I have a 1969 Camaro with 350/350 engine and trans combo. I rebuilt the suspension with all new bushings,ball joints,shocks and polyurethane subframe bushings. I converted the front to a factory disc brake setup. I have noticed that I have some positive camber on both front tires and I want to at least adjust it for ZERO camber so that I can drive it to a shop for a proper front end alignment.

When I rebuilt the front suspension I made sure and put the upper control arm bushings back where they came from on each side and when I replaced the subframe bushings I changed them out one at a time so that I wouldn't disturb the alignment of the frame itself...I also used some big bolts to stick into the locating holes near each subframe bushing to make sure things stayed the same.

(For the driver side upper control arm there are 3 shims on the front and 1 shim in the back.)

(For the passenger side upper control are there is 1 shim in front and 1 shim int the back.)

When I replaced the front ball joints,bushings and shocks I had the car up on jack stands and I also tightened the front upper control arms and everything while it was on jack stand.....I think that I made a mistake by doing that and may have messed up my alignment when I got the car off jack stands and sitting on its own weight??? :confused:

My question is what steps do I need to do in order to get the positive camber out and back to at least zero camber so I can drive it to the alignment shop.

If somebody could list the steps in order it would be appreciated.
 

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As the others said, don't worry about camber for the drive to the alignment shop.

However, check the toe in. This is the measurement that most affects tire wear.

With the cars weight on the wheels, measure the distance between the front tires both at the front and at the rear. Adjust the tie rods so that the front of the tires are about 1/16" to 1/8" closer together than the rear of the tires. Have a helper hold one end of the tape measure. Try to measure as high off the ground as possible. That will get you close enough for the trip to the shop.

Definitely follow Al's advice about doing the final torque of the control arm bushings with the weight on the wheels.
 

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If you haven't rolled the car after it came off the jack stands, having positive camber in the front suspension is perfectly normal as the wheels were hanging down with the top of the wheels further out than the bottoms when it hit the ground. Roll the car out of the garage for several wheel revolutions and the wheels will assume their final "as-rebuilt" configuration.
 
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