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I have attatched my plans for wiring my 69 Camaro. I want to have two terminal blocks on the interior the car-one that is always hot and one that is hot only when the key is in the ACC position. I was wondering if it would be a good idea to accomplish this with a relay. Would the relay be able to handle that much power running through it as i will be using 8 gauge wires on terminal 30 and 87 of the relay.
Thanks

 

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The relay looks like a good method to get switched power under the dash. As far as it being able to handle the power it depends on what you are running off it. I assume you are using a 30A relay? That is what it is designed to handle. Otherwise I have a couple suggestions. You should not need 8 ga wire on everything. From what I have read on MAD's site you only need it on the Alternator output and to run power from where that is connected up to the front terminal block/horn relay. You can use the horn relay buss bar as the terminal block in the front unless you really have a lot of relays up there then you could use an 8 ga wire to supply the terminal block from the relay. 10 ga would probably be fine tho because it is a short run. MAD recommends a 10 ga (with 14 ga fusible link) that is 7-10 ft. for the battery charging wire as it will provide a little resistance and not cook your battery. Finally do not use a 1 wire alternator, it basically defeats this system.
 

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8 AWG is good for 40-55A depending on insulation class. What you are doing looks fine to me. I might upsize the main feed to 4AWG so you'd have plenty of capacity there. Also you might want to supply your fan relays directly from the battery instead of putting them on the end of the chain. They're going to draw 10-15A apiece. The way you have it drawn out, there are going to be lots of loads on that one 8 AWG cable so you don't want to have the fans taking up 50-75% of your circuit capacity. I'm also assuming where you have written in "Starter Solenoid" that you meant to write "Alternator", correct?

All you have to do is get the right relay. They are usually readily available in 30A, 40A, and 60A. I would get the largest relay and then fuse the supply before the relay so you won't have to worry about any slim possibility of burnt contacts if your relay is right at your main circuit draw capacity. Fuse the supply side of the relay based on your cable size. I see you are going to do it with fusible link. I personally got rid of all the fusible link and replaced it with fuses.

Here's what I did. It is similar to what you are doing but without some of the junction points which as we know just causes more chances for problems and resistance. Also, I'm using ATC fuse blocks instead of terminal blocks. They are readily available at most parts stores.

I'm using a 105A one wire alternator and am using the original harness to supply the car's fuse panel except I got rid of the main fusible link and replaced it with an auto reset circuit breaker. My auxiliary circuits are used to supply anything that did not come on the car originally and they are fed by new wiring that is separate from the main car harness.

Ran an AGU fused cable straight from battery positive into the car and under the console.
Connected to main feed on a six circuit auxiliary fuse block that can use up to 30A fuses on each circuit. They have a male spade on them that is only hot when a fuse is inserted.
That's the "always hot" block.
Fused one of those outputs with a 30A fuse, ran it across a 40A relay, and to another auxiliary fuse block also under the console.
The relay is activated by a wire run from the ACC terminal on the main fuse panel.
So, now there is a six circuit always hot fuse block and a six circuit keyed power fuse block.



This is what the fuse blocks look like. They're made by Cooper Bussman and are a little bigger than a credit card.




Here is an AGU fuse holder.




These battery terminal extenders are good too.

 

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Very neat product Steiner.... that fuse block. I've never noticed them in the stores before, but from now on that's what's going to take the place of plain old terminal blocks.

Where is your auto reset circuit breaker? Is it a module in one of the additional fuse blocks? Or somewhere inline where the fusible link originally ran?
 

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Very neat product Steiner.... that fuse block. I've never noticed them in the stores before, but from now on that's what's going to take the place of plain old terminal blocks.

Where is your auto reset circuit breaker? Is it a module in one of the additional fuse blocks? Or somewhere inline where the fusible link originally ran?
Hey thanks. Yeah, they work pretty good and are fairly easy to hide. The two I have are accessible by removing the shifter plate/cover on the console. Adding new wires is a little bit of a pain though since I've got the AutoMeter gauge pod setup in the front of the console. One has been tested already....I ran a 10AWG amplifier feed for a small Class D sub amp in the trunk down the transmission tunnel before I put the carpet in so it would be away from the rear speaker wires and RCA cable on the left side and the antenna cable which I ran on the right side. Guess it must've slipped down at some point and gotten pinched when I put the seats in because the fuse was blown when I finally put the amp and sub in last week. Did the lazy thing and ran a new cable under the carpet but on top of the wiring gutter. No noise thankfully.

I've actually got two of the circuit breakers. Both are mounted on the radiator core support above the battery. One feeds the original main cable going to the horn relay. The other goes to the main supply for my EFI system. They're pretty small and Flex-O-Lite used to put them with their electric fans but I don't know if they still do or not. They're only a few bucks and I think those six circuit blocks were maybe seven dollars plus the fuses.

Here's a shot of my bird's nest. The orange cable is the AGU fused one that feeds the aux blocks under the console and you can see the circuit breakers on the core support.


 

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For wiring my two large rad. fans I went with a Cole-Hersee continuous duty marine solenoid(looks like a regular ford starter solenoid) and ran 4 gauge wire direct from the battery to the input side of the solenoid. On the output side I ran two 10 gauge wires through two circuit breakers, each wire going to one fan. This took care of my problem with blowing the the Bosch type relay although the original owner of my car was only using one relay for two fans, not a good idea. With the Cole-Hersee 24047 solenoid you can add a lot of electrical circuits off of it with no worries. It has a 100 amp carry rating. I think it cost me $23 from ase-supply.com
 

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Double post for some reason....
 

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