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Discussion Starter #1
What would cause the connectors on my fan switch to start to melt. It appears that they have been hot enough to cause the connector to disform, but no fuse has blown and the switch still works. I have noticed that the previous owner had changed the wire that connects to the ac relay had placed a ground wire on one of the screws holding the relay to the ac box. I have replaced the harness and most likely will replace the relay, unless I can figure out how to check the relay. But I still wonder why the switch got hot enough to heat up the connector. Any Ideas out there.
 

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I agree with Nantooch. Bad connections = resistance = heat. But I wonder if the switch isn't miswired. First off, is this a Camaro? Second, is this relay fan setup factory or custom? A circuit capable of pulling enough current to cause a meltdown should be connected through a relay. Sounds like you are pulling 10s of amps through the switch if it can get that hot. If this is a custom job, I'd suggest checking the relay wiring carefully. I suspect the switch is carrying the load of the fan when it should only carry the load of a relay coil.

Once you get this all worked out and clean any corroded connections, I recommend you purchase a tube of dielectric grease. It can be found at auto-parts stores. It's a silicon based grease that protects the connections from air and moisture. Pack you newly cleaned connection with the stuff before plugging it in. Should prevent future problems from bad connections - particularly on high current circuits.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
This connector was on the fan switch of a 69 camaro with original ac. When I purchased the car, everything worked except the ac, it would blow air just not cold, but I just figured that it needed more R-12. I had noticed that some of the wires had but cut and spliced so I purchased a new ac wiring harness. I found that the ac relay had the connectors on it except for the ground and the ground had been replaced from it's original connector to a screw on the base of the relay. I'm going to purchase a new relay switch. I also found the orange and red wire that was in the gutter. Learned about the orange but still not sure of the red.
 

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This is the layout of the wires going to my blower relay that works great. Not sure about a red wire for the a/c system there. Be carefull with new relay switches, some books told the NAPA man to use a different relay with tabs in different positons. It didnt work and I took it back along with my old one. Make sure the tabs line up exactly as shown here. Hope this helps.
 

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Yeah, that's the way mine is now with the new harness. The old wiring had a small orange (maybe a 20 gauge)going to where the the black tab should go and the black wire that should have been there went to a screw that mounted on the relay. Don't know what the previous owner was doing, but I intend to get a new relay just to make sure. Also found that the orange wire was to the fan in a car without ac just not sure about the red one. They are a 10 gauge wire I believe.
 

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I had a similar problem with my '69 after I first bought it; the plastic connector on the A/C relay got REALLY hot and started to melt. Close inspection revealed that this was not the first occurrence and the female spade connectors were not lining up with the male A/C relay terminals.

Two problems - one was the loose connections generating resistance/heat, the second was that the ends were significantly corroded - generating more resistance/heat. Release the "lock" on the spade connectors and push them out for polishing with a Dremel.
 
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