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a couple weeks ago I went and got 4 new Uniroyal Tigerpaws put on my '69; and also allingment. Took the car out this weekend and I noticed the tires were "squealing" at almost every turn. At times, they would squeal at the slightest touch. I also notice I have lost a little of the turning radius (or so it feels). I didn't think much about it at the time, but the technician said something about my car having very little room left for "something", I can't remember. Certainly, I'm taking it back, but what in the world is up with that? I know the Tigerpaws arent the best in the world as far as performance, I just felt they looked a little old-school for my stock car. THANKS
 

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This reminds me of a time when I had new tires put on my stock size 14" rims after a front end rebuild for the 69 Camaro.
Car's tires squealed just as you are describing. Took my car back with my ole faithful old Chilton service manual which had the factory alignment specs.
The alignment shops computer system only went back to 1970 and the tech assumed it was the same.
After the realignment using the alignment specs from the Chilton manual everything was good to go.
 

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It has been an eternity sit I sat in alignment class or even helped align a car. There are three alignment angles on your car....Caster, Camber and Toe. The most ignored alignment angle is caster. It's greatest effect is on steering stability, steering effort and steering return; so it is often the most ignored angle. Vehicle ride height can also affect caster. From what I can recall Corvette's would have the most positive caster in order to increase steering stability, steering effort and return.

I would question the alignment tech on where your car was at in regards to the alignment specifications.
 

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You don't really need to understand all that.
You got a bad alignment. Take it back.
New tires, New alignment. All should be good with a professional shop that checks all front suspension parts also.
Now be suspect of this shop.

Alignment is no good if parts are bad.

Camber set at 0 both sides. Manuals will say 1/2P, but anyone experienced at doing this will know from experience that 0 will be best here in Illinois for sure.
Caster set at 0 also with a range of 1/4N to 3/4P. and 1/2 degree more on passenger side.
Toe 1/8 to 1/4.
If you are a big guy, have the alignment guys put some weights on the drivers seat first IF you pretty much just drive it by yourself. If you are racing there are a lot of different opinions.

Another thing that gets forgotten. These machines require some type of calibration. Old machines, more calibration. If the guy doing the alignment does not understand the calibration or has not done it, you are screwed. Try asking a mechanic about the calibration. It will make you fell like an A** H*** because he does not know how to do his job. Ask the guy his qualifications, that will make you feel the same. There are good shops, you just have to find one. Onfortunately, this is one of those areas that a guy can hide how bad he is for a long time and no one will notice, except when he really screws up. Like on your car.

Has your car ever been in an accident?
 
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