Team Camaro Tech banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled my wheel off and have leaky wheel cylinder and shoes are getting close to worn out. I bought a new wheel cylinder and shoes. My question is, what tools do I need to replace the shoes with all the springs and crap in there. I have put liquid wrench on the wheel cylinder nuts and the line connection. I never did a brake job before but would like to know from some veterans whether I need special tools or not. I really want to do this but thought it might be wise to get some advice about this first. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
I've done it with vice grips and a screwdriver but a brake spring tool makes it a lot easier. It looks like a big pair of pliers, one jaw is a point and the other wraps around it. The other ends have special uses too, one removes/replaces the round keepers that hold the shoes to the backing plate, the other is for reinstalling the big springs.


An adjusting tool is also handy they look about like this:


Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,810 Posts
Dawg and Tugboat beat me to the punch. Tool can be found at you local auto store. I also suggest either taking pictures or printing off pictures from this web site so that you know where everything goes when putting it back together. Also remember to put the brake star adjuster on the correctly. I have seen pictures in some of the posts where someone has flip flopped it end for end. Then you can't adjust them. I had never done a drum brake before either. But that was one of winter projects this year. Everything turned out fine, got my info from these forums. When bleeding your brakes start at the brake furthest from the master cylinder. You may need to readjust your emergency brake cable. But the rear brakes themselves are self adjusting. Once the drums are installed adjust them for a slight drag when rotating the drum. When you have the wheels on, back up the car and apply the brakes. That will set them. Correct me guys if I am wrong. I don't want to give anyone the wrong info. But that is what I did. Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
633 Posts
I think you can "rent'" those tools too. If you're not doing a lot of brake jobs it's probably a good idea. But yeah, the purpose made brake tools make this a breeze. It amazed me after battling it with a pair of needle nose :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. Im going to pick up one of those tools. My car is pretty rusty so I will let you all know if anything breaks like the bolts for the wheel cylinder. THe bleeder valves are broken off of both sides so IM hoping the wheel clyinders dont break off too at the nut heads. Im looking forward to a challenge with all the brake springs etc, but not broken bolt heads. I did soak them for a few days so i have my fingers crossed.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
15,375 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,375 Posts
I got another story. Remember my auto shop story about the teacher taking the muffler off of the donated Ford 289 and then grinning for guests?
Yep, brakes. It's 1964. He had just demo-ed the removal of a rear drum to do the brake job. Then he grabbed a air hose with a 'blow nozzle'. He aimed it at the old, still in-place parts and let fly. He disappeared in the cloud of dust. Then he stepped out of the dust walking toward the class. Yep, same grin! Several of us left the class and remained in the hall until the dust settled. (teacher was a smoker too) And in those days we hadn't heard of asbestoses.
Rob, be very careful not to kick up dust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,305 Posts
do one side at a time, so you always have the other side to use as a mirror image when putting it all back together.
i always lay the parts on the floor next to me just as i take them off. that way, you know where everything goes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
about the spring retainers
I bought the spring pliers shown in the picture here above. Dosnt one end do the retainer clips? It looks like a cup at the end of a rod on one half of the plier arms. I thought that is what thats for. I printed out a picture of all the parts in the brake drum I found on the internet so its beginnging to make more sense now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
33,290 Posts
No, the cup on the end of one handle is the spring remover, put the cup over the anchor bolt and twist the tool to put cup lip under the spring and pull off the spring.

The other handle end is the spring installer - hook the spring onto the shoe, the other end onto the tool shank, and the V onto the anchor bolt, then pry up on the tool handle and spring slids onto the anchor bolt.

DON'T GET YOUR FINGER(S) IN THE WAY!!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,375 Posts
Good job Everett. I would have told him to find somebody to show him how it's done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I ended up not using any tools except a vice grips. I did buy a brake spring tool, but as I sat there, It seemed to make more sense to see if I could just use the small vice grips and pull off the spring. It came off easily. It also worked well on the retainer things. Im cleaning everything and painting them so I wont put it together for a couple days. Everything was rusty but good enough condition to use again I think. The bolts for the wheel cylinder came off easy. I think the soaking with penetrating oil helped. Some day in the future I'll put new backing plate on because there is a bit of rusting away on the outside bottom fin thing I noticed while cleaning. This was a fun job so far. I hope putting it back together is as easy as taking it all off. I took some notes down and drew a picture of the bottom spring between the shoes so I put it back the right way.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
33,290 Posts
Just before installing the drum, place the drum onto the shoes, just before the drum engages onto the studs, to determine the amount eh salck needed to take up by adjusting the shoes to fit.

Put the drum on, see the loose fit, withdraw the drum, adjust the adjuster to take up the space/slack. You cna use pliers for this job. Final adjustment would be done with drum installed all the way onto the axle studs and using the adjustment spoon, adjust the shoes for a slight drag, barely touching. A better feel would be with the tire/wheel installed.

If the adjuster gets too tight, use a small screwdriver to push the self-adjuster to the outside of the drum and use the spoon to pull the shoes inward to allow a slip fit.

When using the spoon to adjust, catch the tooth of the adjuster and pulling down on the spoon expands the adjuster to tighten the shoes.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,341 Posts
Screw that tool and use vice-grips and hoss the springs into position instead!!

I could NEVER get that sucker ta do what I wanted done!! That and that funky, lock/unlocker tool that takes the shoe clip/washers off that is like a screwdriver w/ a big cylinderical shaped head on it!!! Not good tools unless it's just me???

And a cheap brake cylinder hone is a very good investment!! I think from Leslie along w/ a set of extra stones.

You can do caliper bores and even lifter bores w/ it..

pdq67
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
( 69 with original power disc front and drum rear) I put everything back with new wheel cylinder and new axle line. I put the car down and tried to bleed the brakes but both the right and left bleeder have no fluid coming out. I started the car and moved it around and used the parking brake which seems to light up and work then turn off correctly. The brake feels almost normal but... NO FLUID is coming out of the bleeder valves in the rear! Anybody have any ideas what Im doing wrong? The master cylinder is full of fluid but zero comes out of the rear bleeders even if I take them out all the way off. ? Am I supposed to bleed the brakes with a helper and have the engine running? Maybe that is what is wrong?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,341 Posts
You will need a Buddy to pump them for you unless you buy a vacuum or pressure bleeder deal.

Start w/ the one farthest away from the M/C, (the rear pass. side), and bleed the rear drivers side next, then the pass. side front and finally the drivers side front and you will be good to go.

And watch the fluid levels in the M/C too.

pdq67
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I had someone pump them and hold,, then I let the bleeder out, but nothing came out.. Both sides are dry. Strange part is that the brakes dont feel too bad. Does anyone know if its normal to not see fluid after say 5 pump and hold on each wheel? I did change the axle line so there wasnt much but air around there. When I took the old lines off, not much came out either.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top