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Discussion Starter #1
I just put a new battery in my 69 (900 CCA) and left it on a 10 amp charger over night to make sure that it was fully charged and then put 30-40 miles on the car. No problems. (Wells digital voltage regulator.)

About 10 days later without being cranked, it didn't have enough juice to crank. I had the same problem with the old battery but it was over 8 years old so it didn't surprise me that it wouldn't stay charged.

Battery shows about 12.7 V. with motor off. 14.6 V. at idle. With iginition switch off and no accessories on, it draws .007-.008 amps according to my Greenlee digital multimeter. (Radio is an old Pioneer analog unit that has no digital read out or memory.)

I haven't started pulling any fuses to try to isloate the draw but this certainly doesn't seem like enough to run down my battery.

I've just started pulling the positive cable when it's not going to be started for a week or so. What should I be checking? Thanks, Jim
 

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I've had cars that draw 0.01 and they can sit for weeks without draining the battery dead. I last drove my Nova back on Easter Sunday and it started right back up this last Thursday and it was fine (I also have a digital radio that draws a minute amount of current).
If you have a small current draw then maybe disconnect the alternator wires and then regulator wires and see what happens. If the meter reading does not change then you can plug them back in and work further into the car.

It's possible you have a bad battery also. Try chargng it up without one cable hooked to the car so nothing can drain it down and the let is sit a while with the battery charger disconnected to allow the battery to come down to a stable reading. Now take a reading and write it down. Come back a day later and take another reading. Do it some more on different days and see if the readings are staying close to each other. If the voltage keeps going down and down over a week, then I'm thinking the battery is not good. It should get down to a stabilized point and stay close to that.

Jim
 

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Sounds more like you have a bad battery cable, test the cables with your ohm meter.

Dan E.
69 SS396 4spd. 4.10 posi. x66 coupe
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Dan. I haven't done that. But I am putting together a Classic Ind. order to send in tonight. Battery cables are one of the things on the list.

The've got free shipping on $99 orders (except on oversize stuff stuff) till midnight tonight with your internet code. (WS7418)

So far, I've got 16 items and still adding. I'm only on page 702 of their catalog and have 120 pages left!! Spending that pension money. SS money next July. I can't frigging wait!!
 

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Did you pick up the battery from a qick pick type store or a workshop parts store?
Often batteries sitting on shelves at quick pick stores sit on shelves for a long time, or the stock is not cycled....always chech manufacture date codes
Sitting for long periods is not good for lead /acid batteries.

And is it a lead acid? modern cars often use a different type of cell and are not interchangable due to full cxharging rates.

Another issue could be the type of radio/deck you have....these often when put in older designed cars wireing ciruits are not compatable.
Covered in an old post several yrs back.
Mine to get around, have wired to ign (this is isolated with ign off) and to cigerette lighter, orange wire.
 

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If your charger is unregulated it is possible that you damaged a plate in the battery if you left it on a new battery all day. It shouldn't take more than about six hours to charge a fully discharged battery at 10 amps. Those manual chargers that have an amp setting which simply plug in will ruin a battery if they are not monitored.
 

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I'm going for a bad/dirty/loose connection somewhere between + and the starter...

My son's 1985 Ford pickup had a cab.e that read 12v at the terminal, and 7v at the other end attached to the starter solenoid. Looked completely normal, ends tight, no corrosion...half a dozen guys all looked at it after I told them what was wrong, and they all scratched their heads.
 

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If your charger is unregulated it is possible that you damaged a plate in the battery if you left it on a new battery all day. It shouldn't take more than about six hours to charge a fully discharged battery at 10 amps. Those manual chargers that have an amp setting which simply plug in will ruin a battery if they are not monitored.
Oh yeah the battery companies make a lot of money out of unregulated chargers..and high amp charges....hi amps really kill batteries.
Throw it away..no give it away to someone you dont like...and buy a little more expensive regulated charger...and on that has a switch for starting a car is often quite usefull on cold mornings.

Which reminds me, one on the vintage cars is on trickle charge for the last 24+ hrs...Its dark cold and p155ing down
 
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