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Discussion Starter #1
I understand the theory behind pre-oiling the motor before startup if its been rebuilt or sitting for some time, but wonder what the difference is between that and a situation where the car has been sitting for a week or two and hasn't been started? Doesn't the oil drain from the top of the engine down into the oil pan anyway? So in effect after letting the car sit for weeks/or even a month without starting it aren't you putting it through the same stress as when you have when re-building it and starting it for the first time?
 

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67 the oil will not(or atleast shouldnt) drain back into the pan. In addition to that the parts are all seated and worn in. On a new build there are MANY air pockets as well as the other items listed above to consider. It would extend engine life to prelube the engine before it is started everytime. That is why there are companies that sell prelube kits. One of the benefits of synthetic oil is that it clings to engine parts longer than conventional oil. So the stresses are similar but not nearly the same.

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67 prostreet BB Camaro
80 z28 Camaro 355ci
71 BB SS Chevelle (clone)
2002 35th anniv SS Z28 conv.
 

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when you are starting a brand new engine, nothing inside has been "broken in". the bearings haven't matched up with the journals on the crank, and neither have the mains. after it is run for a bit, they kind of "grow together", or so goes my theory. they also probably get a bit of a heat treat after running for a bit. no to mention all the dirt and stuff that is alway inside a fresh engine.
once it has been broken in, not all the oil drains back to the bottom. some of it gets left in the passages and on the load bearing surfaces (bearings).

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1971 Nova(looks like 69 camaro from underneath!)
355sb, vortec heads, HOT cam,T-10 tranny, 3.70 gears 16X8" IROC wheels. 12" Corvette brakes on the way.
see pics here http://community.webshots.com/user/novaderrik
 

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I let my car sit all winter and start it about once a month. I'll be darned if I'm gonna pull the distributor and use a primer every time I fire it up.
 

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I think the big deal for priming is to get oil in all of the oil galleys throughout the block, get the filter filled up, etc. When it is a brand new engine, you get ALOT of wear from my understanding the first time you crank the engine, before you even start the car. Better safe than sorry on a new engine, I would not personally even think about not priming the engine first. In fact, when I do mine, I prime it while looking at the pressure gauge, and continue to prime it until oil comes out the pushrods. I'll turn it by hand a few turns in between too.
 

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But how long does (should) it take before oil comes out of the pushrods/rockers with prelubing on a new engine?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Since I posted this topic way back when, I have progressed (thanks to the help or many people here) to nearly finishing this project. I have my car street worthy and running and here is what I found when pre-lubing my engine. Using the tool meant for this job, whiich I attached to my electric drill, I'd say it took maybe 3-5 minutes of constant drill time for the oil to reach the rocker arms. I had never done this before, so I pulled one of the valve covers to check and sure enough, there was a good supply of oil up there. I wouldn't fire up a new engine without pre-oiling it. After all the work and the fun I am having now driving the car, that little bit effort was well worth it. Now that I have the car to drive, skipping this step and delaying it's debut on the street because I took a shortcut and skipped this step could have caused problems I didn't need or want. Like I said, it didn't take long, probably 5 minutes and was well worth it!
 
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