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Discussion Starter #1
I think I'm having problems with the tires on my Camaro. At about 100 MPH the car starts to shake from side to side very hard. I've got 31/18.50/15 Hoosier Pro Street radials on it. Does anyone else have a similar problem? I'm going to put a set of slicks on it in a few weeks to see if the problem goes away.
 

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Buddy had a similar issue on his 70 Nova...it was found to be a combination of tire roll out was different and a bent rear.
Tires were swapped for new which helped some, then he broke a sway-bar link mount and found the bend when that was being fixed a month or so later.
Said top end wasn't fun at 140+.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I've been all over the suspension on my car, and the rear end was built with a housing fixture in it. I've adjusted the shocks all the way in both directions. The tires are only a few years old and still seem to be in good shape. I haven't measured the roll out on them. This thing gets wild at about 110 MPH.
 

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I remember him saying it felt like someone in the back rocking side to side.

I'm guessing either a locker or spool ?
 

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Locker or spool won't cause the issue but pinion angle to a bad balance of rotating parts (from drive shaft to tires) will.

Another issue could be the belting in the tread area if that is starting to separate. The radial construction is much more flexible than bias ply tires at the same pressure. not to mention the fabric used to construct the carcass. Wrinkle wall slicks which have an extreme side wall angle could be down right dangerous if he has another issue.

Big Dave
 

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Freddie my brother has a 67 with 14/32 Hoosier slicks and had an issue with the bead. I am thinking it was only with bead locks but they/Hoosier changed the bead design at some point. I don't know if your issue is related to that or not just a little info for you.
They know about the issue and are trying to help people with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks Jonathan. I'll try to contact Hoosier tomorrow and see what they say.

Brent, I'm working on getting another set of tires and I'll try that. I need a set of slicks anyway, so I'm getting a set next week. Then I need to find a set of wheels with the correct 4 1/2 inch back space.
 

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Given who the OP is, I think it is safe to eliminate pinion angle, driveshaft balance and tire balance.

That only leaves three things:
1. Belt separation.
2. Wheel run out.
3. Tire run out.

Freddie, if you were close to me I would be glad to loan you some big rear tires & wheels to try out.

Personally, I would suspect the tires first. But, to be sure, you best check wheels for "TRUE" before going much farther, although you did say you needed tires anyway. Perfect time to check wheel run out if you are on good terms with the installer. Put the wheel on the balancer sans tire and check with a dial indicator. Virtually EVERY wheel manufacturer specifies 1/16 runout as acceptable. I call BS, especially if you are going 110 mph or better. Less than 1/32 in my book.

There are guys out that that can true up wheels and get them right on the money.

One other thought: what wheels are you running? If they are aluminum of any kind and the manufacturer claimed they were "lug centric" that is also total bs. I run Centerlines on two vehicles. One set of wheels manufactured in the 2000's, and one from 1972. I love Centerline wheels, but the claim that they are "lug centric" is crap.

I had hub centric rings made for both. How can a wheel that has an acceptable "range" of clearance for shank type lug nuts be "lug centric"? They can't. It is a sham propigated by wheel manufacturers to save money by producing wheels with a giant hub center that they can then drill for different lug patterns. JMHO (but I am right on this one).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Lynn. I do have one wheel that has a little bit of wobble that you can see when it is on the balancer. They are Centerline Pro Stock wheels made in '86. The tires are not very old and still look good, but I don't think they are holding their shape at high speed. I have no proof of this, but I can't find anything else wrong with the car.
 

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I do have one wheel that has a little bit of wobble that you can see when it is on the balancer.
If you can see the wobble on a balancer, I'd start with that. It's only going to get worse at speed.
 

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Thanks Lynn. I do have one wheel that has a little bit of wobble that you can see when it is on the balancer. They are Centerline Pro Stock wheels made in '86. The tires are not very old and still look good, but I don't think they are holding their shape at high speed. I have no proof of this, but I can't find anything else wrong with the car.
Guessing that by 86 Centerlines were all shank type lug nuts. That may be your problem. Manufacturer will tell you they are lug centric. No way.

I purchased two sets of hub centric rings for Centerline wheels to Chevy axle hub size. They are a must if you want to eliminate vibration. You will have to have them made though, as I searched hi and lo and found no off the shelf rings that fit. Cost is just under $80 for custom rings, but well worth it. Everyone I know who runs Centerlines without the rings has to re-torque the shank type lug nuts occasionally. I never do.

As for the wheel that wobbles, as stated above, if you can see it wobble, it is way too bent to use at high speed.

Be careful, man. Your statment "This thing gets wild at about 110 MPH" reminds me of a motorcycle experience I had in 1983.

Suzuki GS1100E. At the time, the fastest production bike around. Magazines said something about it being a "wriggling handful" at speed. I figured they were over stating the case. They were understating. One night on a smooth two lane black top with zero traffic, took her up to about 130 mph (didn't take long to get there, that bike would do 0-100 and back to zero in 10 seconds in the hands of a capable rider. Anyway, hit just the slightest little imperfection in the road and the handlebars start shaking violently back and forth, like 8 inches. Holy chit. Almost crapped my pants. Let off the gas. No change. Blipped the throttle. No change. Tapped the brakes. No change. Not until I slowed down below 100 did it even out. Parked it on the side of the road, sat ont he curb with my knees hitting each other I was so shook up. Sold it the next day. Feeling nastolgic, I did buy an identical bike in 2007 with only2500 miles on it, knowing that in my old age, I would never foolishly exceed 100. After two episodes of inattentive drivers causing me to lock up the brakes (no ABS), and my brother almost getting killed on his bike whild doing less than the speed limit I sold that one as well.

Anyway, get this ficured out.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I don't completely understand what these rings are that you are talking about. I'm a tool maker and have access to any type of machine that I could need to make these rings, but I need to know more about them.
 

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I don't completely understand what these rings are that you are talking about. I'm a tool maker and have access to any type of machine that I could need to make these rings, but I need to know more about them.
This is a random image I pulled off a google search, the blue ring is the hub centric ring. A hub centric ring matches the sizing of the camaro hub/spindle to the diameter of the wheel opening. Aftermarket wheels usually have a larger/generic center hole so they will fit on a variety of cars, forcing the lug nuts to center the wheels. A proper hub centric ring takes up the gap and allows the hub to center the wheel instead.

 
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