Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I started hearing a lot of valve train noise coming from my 427 in the past few weeks, but thought it was just mechanical lifter noise. Saturday it got bad enough I thought I better check it out. The valve lash is suppose to be set at .020, but number 5 intake had .082. I took the rocker arm off and checked it and the push rod, but both were fine. I pulled the lifter out and the bearing in the roller was gone. The lifter body had been rubbing on the cam lobe, but didn't dammage it. This thing only has about 4,000 or 5,000 miles on it. Has any body else had problems like this from a roller cam? It is a Comp Cams 308AR-10 with #819 lifters. If I get the time to pull the engine back out this winter, this cam is gone. I'm sick of worn out distributor gears and all of the other headachs this thing has caused.

------------------
'69 RS/SS396 pro street
427/4spd/9"
Byars Performance
High Performance Drive Train Parts And Service
www.lubedealer.com/biggearhead
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
Freddie, i've heard nothing but bad things about comp lifters. Ed bigley is using Crower severe duty solid roller lifters and has 20,000+ street miles on them with not problems. The lifters are on a comp "street" roller cam.
If your still in doubt you can have crower put in the "HIPPO" option (high pressure pin oiling) to assist in low speed oiling.
Get a cam with a cast distributor gear on the end of it, so you dont need the bronze distrubtor gears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
Sorry to hear about all the bad luck you've had, hopefully with a cam change you'll have her running reliably for a long time!
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I saw an ad in a magazine receintly about some new lifters that were made to run on a roller cam, but had no roller on the end. They were round on the end, but solid. Has anyone else seen these and do you know anything about them?

------------------
'69 RS/SS396 pro street
427/4spd/9"
Byars Performance
High Performance Drive Train Parts And Service
www.lubedealer.com/biggearhead
 

·
Gold Lifetime Member
Joined
·
10,496 Posts
Those non-rollerized lifters are called radiused lifters and are made by Joe Schubeck. They require a camshaft from him also (will not work on a standard roller cam) and cost about $1450 for the cam and lifters.

By the way, I too lost one of the Comp Endure-X lifters in my ZL-1. I went to the Crower with HIPPO option.


Jody

------------------
http://www.camcojb.com/

[This message has been edited by Camcojb (edited 08-14-2002).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
396 Posts
This is interesting, I did a lot of research on these a while ago. I was thinking of going the roller route myself. What the reseach revealed was that most people were only able to get about 5K-10K miles out of one of these rollers.

Kind of wondering what's up because the newer cars have rollers, why are the retrofit cams and lifters having problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,982 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The OEM roller cams have hydraulic lifters. I guess the lash of the solid lifters beats up the bearings too much for street use.

------------------
'69 RS/SS396 pro street
427/4spd/9"
Byars Performance
High Performance Drive Train Parts And Service
www.lubedealer.com/biggearhead
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,663 Posts
Part of it is the method used to keep the lifter in its proper position. The late model OEM hydro lifters have two sides of the lifter machined flat so that the lifter looks kind of like this from the top:
_
(_)

A flat piece of steel with two silimarly shaped holes fits over each pair of lifters. A piece of spring steel bolts to the center of the lifgter valley and holds each lifter retainer in place. Because the lifter is not round in the area around the retainer, it can't turn in the lifter bore.

Several people have had problems with the rivets that are used to attach the bars to the lifter body on the aftermarket lifters.

I recently read an article in a mag about how the guys running in the crate motor classes use the stock hydro roller lifters. They do a modification that takes a lot of the hydraulic movement out of the lifter - almost, but not quite, making them solid rollers. This allows them to rev the engines over 7,000 RPMs without problems.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top