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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Enough beating around the bush, let's make this project official.

Fifteen years ago, a '69 Camaro Z10 was tucked away into a quaint little barn somewhere in the fertile farmland of rural Illinois. Destiny (and a wire transfer of $8,000) has put this sleeping beauty into my ownership and it will soon rise from beneath its pee-stained moving blankets to achieve its former glory. My first order of business has been to assign it a NATO-style codename to make it sound exciting, and have dubbed this project "Deep Gambit" after some thoughtful meditation and also using this codename generator thingy online. It's a fitting name because I will likely have to delve deep into my bank accounts to finish this project and it's certainly a gambit because right now I have absolutely no idea what I'm doing.

Also, "Hairy Flamingo" and "Clumsy Bagpipe" were the first two results in the codename generator and I thought they just didn't command the respect a '69 RS/SS Camaro should bring.

The car is scheduled for delivery to my garage in Tucson, AZ over 4th of July weekend. Between now and then, I'm building a shopping list for my garage and keeping an eye on Craigslist to get things ready. My short list includes:

- 220vAC installation
- Ziplock bags for storing and labeling parts
- 80-gallon air compressor
- Media blasting cabinet
- Ziplock bags for storing and labeling parts
- Workbench construction
- Tabletop parts washer
- Pneumatic tools
- Oven (for powder coating smaller components)
- Ziplock bags for storing and labeling parts
- MIG welder

I also heard you should have plenty of Ziplock bags on hand for storing and labeling parts, so I'll probably add that to my shopping list.

I'll throw a few pictures up to start documenting the restoration process. I've already spent dozens of hours on this forum going through several build threads (350sshugger, 6781camaro, tpsmith and many others) trying to get an idea for what I'm in for, and I'm already tremendously grateful to all the folks who have detailed their restoration projects so meticulously. I hope to contribute to future build projects in the same way you folks have already helped me. I am a "resto_noob" in every sense, so please be understanding when I post questions like, "how do I glue two pieces of metal together?" or, "what does the transmission do?"

Looking forward to getting Deep Gambit out of that barn in Illinois and into my Tucson, AZ garage! These first few pics are how the car currently looks in its nesting place among all the feral barn cats.

-Chris
 

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Wow. That doesn't look like much of a project. It looks like some soap, water and wax will get you riding down the road in style! Congrats and good luck!
 

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Congrats! Oh and don't forget to get some ziplock bags:beers:
 

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I always tell people new to restoration work to CLEAN UP everyday when you are done for the day. Sweep, vacuum and put your tools away everyday even though you may come back to the same part of the project again. Clean and organized helps keep your mind motivated. Also it will help you get back into the groove and remember what you were doing and what you want to do. I also keep a nice set of wheels around and put on the car. Nice shiny wheels add to the visual effect and make you feel good about you project and keep you motivated to finish.
 

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Storage shelves to put parts on. Very important in organizing a project and take lots of pictures as you take the car apart.

I use 3 ring binders for all my projects. Divider for receipts, instructions, electrical etc. Works out that as I built a car I'm also building a owners manual that's easy to reference when needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All good advice! Leaving a dirty work space is nails on a chalkboard for me so I'll definitely be keeping that in check. Gotta fix the shelving/storage situation first. More pictures coming soon when the car makes the journey in a few short weeks!
 

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I would suggest a proper air delivery system to keep water out of your air tools and off your project - and convenient locations to attach your hoses. Something like this: Air Piping Layout
Looks like a fun project! Are you planning on putting a big block back in it?
 
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I would suggest a proper air delivery system to keep water out of your air tools and off your project - and convenient locations to attach your hoses. Something like this: Air Piping Layout
Looks like a fun project! Are you planning on putting a big block back in it?
That's the basic design I used with copper. I would never use black pipe like I see a lot of guys use. Black pipe rusts and forms scale etc on the inside. Also, go with 3/4" main feed and tee off into 1/2" for your drops.



This is the air compressor I ended up going with. The only thing I'd do different is get an 80 gal and a 1,750 rpm vs the 3,400 or so that mine is. Not a big deal though. It works excellent.
 

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Definitely a nice system, but I like sweating copper tubing. I just feel like it's a more sturdy system for a shop too. Especially around welding. The biggest advantage of copper is if I want to add a drop or make a change. I go get a couple of fittings and copper tube that are relatively cheap and readily available anywhere and away you go. I'm sure the other system has it's advantages too.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow, see, this is exactly the kind of feedback I was hoping to get by posting a build thread. I'm planning my compressed air system as we speak and this helps tremendously. Anybody have reviews for the 80-gal Husky brand compressors available at Lowe's or Home Depot? The price tag seems kind of cheap compared to used compressors on Craigslist or Ebay and I'm wondering how well those hold up.
 

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I just picked up a 20 gal Husky for my garage. So far I like it.
 

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I have had a 80 gallon Huskey for over 15 years and it has worked great. I do not use it every day or even every week depending what I am doing on the car. It says "Made in USA" on the side of the compressor and I do not know if that is the still the case. I have run small grinders, impact tools, drills and the like with it with no problems. It was quite a bit cheaper then the current 80 gallon offerings from them. IR makes good compressors.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
It's been a long few weeks waiting for the car to make the voyage from Illinois to Arizona. One week to go. Not much to report besides getting the garage in a state worthy to receive the project when it finally rolls off the trailer on July 3rd.

No, no. That messy garage will not do. This felt really good on my OCD.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
It's been a long few weeks waiting for the car to make the voyage from Illinois to Arizona. One week to go. Not much to report besides getting the garage in a state worthy to receive the project when it finally rolls off thr trailer on July 3rd.
 
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