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Discussion Starter #1
I have a tanks inc setup with a pwm pump
Does the ecm control the pump directly or do i need another component
Thanks
 

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You will need a PWM controller like the one Vaporworx sells. The pressure sender too.

This assumes you want to use PWM control. Of course you can always use a Corvette regulator or any other regulator. Pump will just run wide open instead of variable speed.

Don
 

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I do for the fact that the output can fluctuate depending on voltage given keeping the pump cooler and quieter
Ok then you will need a Vaporworx controller, sender etc.

Don
 

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Though the pump is PWM compatible, there's a bit more to it for the pump and control systems to function properly.

For PWM controlled pumps in a closed-loop electrical system a minimal amount of fuel must pass through them during operation. This amount is more than what the engine needs at idle can cruise. Hence, a high pressure bypass (controlled leak) is needed. We have had good success with similar tank/pump arrangements by drilling a small hole in the hardline tube that is inside the tank where the hose from the pump connects. This way the bypassed fuel is simply returned to the fuel load.

In other applications an external fitting is can be used. For a TI450lph a 0.041" x 1/8" long restrictions works well. For an Aeromotive Stealth 340, a 0.025" bypass is appropriate. I've not tested the TI F90000288 that is in question by the OP but something in the 0.025 - 0.032" is likely in the ballpark. Only testing will tell.

The OEM's however put this bypassed fuel to work by driving suction pumps. These pumps fill the module reservoir and/or transfer fuel from remote sections of the tank. These reservoirs have a huge advantage vs. anything else in the market: 1) slosh control, and 2) pump inlet head. Slosh problems are a thing of the past with the reservoirs. The inlet to the pump, especially at lower, and hot, fuel levels is the primary cause of "vapor lock." Fuel boils at the inlet to the pump and pressure falls. By reducing the speed of the pump (PWM), keeping heat out of the fuel load (non-recirculating), and having a high inlet head pressure (reservoir) helps keep the pump properly fed.

Simply put, there is nothing in the aftermarket that is in the same orbit as an OEM fuel module.
 

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Though the pump is PWM compatible, there's a bit more to it for the pump and control systems to function properly.

For PWM controlled pumps in a closed-loop electrical system a minimal amount of fuel must pass through them during operation. This amount is more than what the engine needs at idle can cruise. Hence, a high pressure bypass (controlled leak) is needed. We have had good success with similar tank/pump arrangements by drilling a small hole in the hardline tube that is inside the tank where the hose from the pump connects. This way the bypassed fuel is simply returned to the fuel load.

In other applications an external fitting is can be used. For a TI450lph a 0.041" x 1/8" long restrictions works well. For an Aeromotive Stealth 340, a 0.025" bypass is appropriate. I've not tested the TI F90000288 that is in question by the OP but something in the 0.025 - 0.032" is likely in the ballpark. Only testing will tell.

The OEM's however put this bypassed fuel to work by driving suction pumps. These pumps fill the module reservoir and/or transfer fuel from remote sections of the tank. These reservoirs have a huge advantage vs. anything else in the market: 1) slosh control, and 2) pump inlet head. Slosh problems are a thing of the past with the reservoirs. The inlet to the pump, especially at lower, and hot, fuel levels is the primary cause of "vapor lock." Fuel boils at the inlet to the pump and pressure falls. By reducing the speed of the pump (PWM), keeping heat out of the fuel load (non-recirculating), and having a high inlet head pressure (reservoir) helps keep the pump properly fed.

Simply put, there is nothing in the aftermarket that is in the same orbit as an OEM fuel module.
Interesting and informative as usual. Thanks Carl.

Don
 

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Yeah buy a ricks tank with a vaporworx pump. One of the best on the market!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah buy a ricks tank with a vaporworx pump. One of the best on the market!

lloking into it the restomod tank is more my style it says it accepts 2011-2017 camaro pump modules but it looks like there is another hole in the tank for what it looks to be for a sender isnt it integrated into the module?
 

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lloking into it the restomod tank is more my style it says it accepts 2011-2017 camaro pump modules but it looks like there is another hole in the tank for what it looks to be for a sender isnt it integrated into the module?
There is a sender but it is not compatible with stock gauges.

Don
 

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Steven, 98 and newer GM use a 40-250 ohm sender I think. The extra hole is for a fuel sender. I used a 5 bolt tube type sender. 100X better than the older style.
 

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I ordered everything Carl hooked me up with everything i need and i shopped around rock auto had best price on MU1959 pump.
Stay tuned
 

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I ordered everything Carl hooked me up with everything i need and i shopped around rock auto had best price on MU1959 pump.
Stay tuned
Thanks for trusting us Steve.

Great call on the MU1959 fuel module. All kidding aside, $108 for a 600hp capable fuel module that is light years more advanced than anything available in the marketplace? That's a steal.

The Rick's tank, GM module, and the PWM controller will completely drain the tank dry before running out fuel even under track/aggressive canyons/cloverleafs, etc. conditions. The modern modules are that good.
 
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