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Discussion Starter #1
I am begining a quest for a 1st generation Camaro. In 1968, I bought my first, and only, new car, a 1968 Camaro. It was a 250 Six, Ash Gold with three on the floor and the Corvette styled wheels. A year a half later, I had to trade it in on a family car due to number one son arriving.

So, forty seven years later, I am selling a 1960s Alfa Romeo Spider, with the idea of converting that sale into a '67 or '68 Camaro.

As I begin the quest, I am interested in researching the typical issues I might encounter with that particular car. Obviously I know to check for rust, and I have noted some articles which describe the usual weak points to check for on the Camaro.

What other areas need specific attention? For example, suspension bushings, bearings, driveline issues, wiring? In Brit cars of this age, electrics are always an issue if not properly sorted.

Any suggestions of printed material to use in this quest will be appreciated.

I am not looking for a concours or #1 car, and probably net even a #2, but rather a good solid driver.

Thanks in advance for any and all assistance.

Bruce Sharer
Raleigh, NC
 

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search here and over at CRG any vin numbers you get from prospect vehicles. :)
 

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Hi Bruce,
Welcome to Team Camaro.
Good Luck with your search.
 

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Welcome & Good Luck!

I spent 4 years looking before I found my Camaro.
They are out there, you just have to "weed through" the bad one's.
 

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Camaros the thing I think to look for are pretty much the same as any old car. Some people think they have gold just because it is an old Camaro. If the wiring is good then everything should work, if the engine smokes or has water in oil or oil in water figure in the cost of a rebuild, slipping tranny figure in rebuild, sloppy front end(won't be tight like new cars anyway) figure in front end rebuild. Best you can hope for is an honest sales person. Good luck in the search, I think you can get a nice Camaro for 15k a really nice one for 20k, one that needs nothing for 25k. When getting up into the 30's and up it is either super modified or super rare and original.Enjoy nothing like nostalgia brain, it really does bring you back.
 

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I think the mechanical things are to be expected and pretty easy to ferret out and put a price tag on.

What I would be worried about is hidden rust:

rear shock mounts (you can see them inside trunk, but underneath car is where the support structure is)

trunk pan

wheel wells

floor under carpets

sides of cowl (under fenders)

heater box

dash where it meets windshield - seen some quicky repairs that just rust away later

rust around windshield and rear window hidden by molding

Sub-frame mounts rusted under rubber body mounts.

There are probably others but my brain just froze up......

Some of these are hard to inspect, but costly to repair. Getting the car on a lift can make some of it easier to see.
 

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First off, enjoy your search!

Try to find a friend that has experience in bodywork or Camaros to accompany you. Almost anything mechanical is rather east to fix. By far, the most costly mistake will be to purchase a car that needs extensive rust repair/sheet metal replacement. To the untrained eye, very shady bodywork can be hidden very well under new paint.

Be very cautious of any freshly painted car. Pain that is several years old rarely hides much
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the words of wisdom. I am making a list of suggestion I receive, and will continue to monitor this thread. I do have some experience in dealing with old vehicles, mostly little foreign sports cars, but not with Camaros. I was a car neophyte when I purchased the 1968 Camaro.When it was traded for a family sedan, I began my relationship with foreign cars - Triumph, MG, Volvo, Austin, Alfa, Fiat, not to mention the Citroen and Saab.
 

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Second the bodywork recs - great ones above. That said, one quirk to be aware of is the marketplace. For Gen 1's, it's insane. People watch too many car shows and think that any rustbucket they own is pure gold, tend to market and price it based on "potential" rather than actual value... Just plan on seeing a few cars and have a very low threshold to walk away if something seems off. Particular known issues are fake (or incorrectly marketed) RS's, SS's, Z28's, COPOs, etc. Also, re-engined 6cyl cars, or cars sold as "clean, original paint, never crashed" that have had major repairs albeit 15 yrs ago before the current owner bought it. For reference, my '67 true RS with a base 327/210hp and a 3sp with a straight body but cruddy interior was $11k three years ago. I waded through a lot of false advertising before finding it, though.

Also, be aware that almost anything for these cars is reproduced so missing parts usually don't mean the end of the world, but the cost of repro parts adds up if you're missing a lot. For example, new interior vinyl and carpet is fairly cheap... but add all the trim pieces and it's multiple thousands.
 

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Also, be patient and wait for the right car. You will most likely know it the minute you see it. I looked for years and saw multiple cars-most overpriced rust buckets or hacked up junk. Out of nowhere, a 67 RS-SS 350 that spent all its life in the California desert came up on Ebay only 10 miles from me. The car was a fantastic looking driver with one repaint in the 80s. I knew as soon as I saw the car and saw its virgin floors, trunk, and sheet metal that it was the one and bought it on the spot. So glad I didn't settle for some of the junk I had thought about buying before this
 
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