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I have a 110V Miller mig welder that I've always used .023 wire with. What all would I have to have different to use .030? I know a different tip and I'd have to flip the feed roller over to use the wider groove but what about the liner? Anything else?

I'm not a very experienced welder and what I'm working on right now is welding 1/2 EMT conduit
 

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I have a 110V Miller mig welder that I've always used .023 wire with. What all would I have to have different to use .030? I know a different tip and I'd have to flip the feed roller over to use the wider groove but what about the liner? Anything else?

I'm not a very experienced welder and what I'm working on right now is welding 1/2 EMT conduit
Are you using gas or flux wire?
 

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Liner should be fine. I use .030 wire all the time. Nothing special about it.

Don
 
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1968 Camaro LS3 TH400 Moser 9” DSE mini tubs
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What application would .030 be preferable over .023? I'm getting close to running out of .023 wire and thought maybe I'd try .030.
Wire diameter is often dictated by the gauge of the parent material.
Imagine trying to run 0.023 on 1/4” plate.
Or the opposite 0.035 on 20 gauge sheet.
There should be a chart on your machine or in the manual that shows ranges of settings with a material referenced in terms of thickness and shield gas used.
75/25 is a argon/CO2 mix that has good arc characteristics, but more expensive than CO2 ( or it used to be ) which has better penetration potential.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yep. I just looked it up. 1/2 inch conduit is .042 according to the internet and my calipers. That is 19 gauge. Looks like I've been running too hot. I had my machine on auto-set but for 16 - 14 gauge material. That's probably why I've been blowing holes in it.

I guess I'll stick with .023. I think there is enough on the spool to finish up this little proejct.
 

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I never run anything but .023 wire in my smaller mig. This rig is used pretty much for welding sheetmetal and occasionally if I'm building some type of jig or mounting stand. If I'm doing frame or suspension work I use the larger mig with either .030 wire.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What about cutting on conduit with an angle grinder and cut off wheel. Does that produce fumes I don't want to breath?

I'm having to bend conduit at sharp 90* curves which are about 2 inch diameter circles. To keep it from kinking I'm cutting slots 1/2 way through the conduit. I cut about 12 slots 1/8 inch apart then the conduit will bend around the curve without kinking. Then to make it strong again I stitch weld the slots back together on the inside of the curve. After bending I could then soak the curved ends in muriatic acid before welding but I can't soak the spots I'll need to weld before bending the curve. So maybe I'll sand down the area I'll be cutting slots into, then use acid once bent before welding.
 

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Ken, You're kind of in a catch 22 situation. The galvanization process is actually applying zinc. Zinc is toxic. Using muriatic acid will off put very toxic fumes. It will also get inside the tubing, based on your description, and leave the tubing susceptible to corrosion. Sawing would probably not be an issue but anytime an abrasive is used on the tubing there will be very fine particles produced that can become airborne causing a potential risk. I'm not trying to scare you but common sense needs to be used knowing these risks. Zinc plating on fasteners was outlawed years ago now, due to the health risks. It's now a trivalent process.
 

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I am curious about the project you are doing that requires welding EMT conduit. As you know there are fittings that will join the pipe that do not require welding.

If you weld two EMT conduit pipes together, there will weld on the inside of the pipe that cannot be removed. The weld might cut a wire's insulation as it is being pulled through the pipe.

EMT is normally used indoors. Even though it is galvanized, it will rust because the coating is very thin and scratches very easily.

I have used rigid type conduit fittings on my car that required welding. I have a paint respirator to protect me when I grind the galvanized coating. You and use a Covid N95 mask. Put a fan behind you and stay upwind of the grinding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I was kinda hoping no one would ask what I'm doing since it's not related to my Camaro. I ask questions about welding here because you guys really know your stuff.

What I'm making are frames that hold the top of bags that collect grass or leaves on my John Deere garden tractor. Here is a pic of the bag and then the original frame. It's just a loop of 1/2 inch thin walled tubing. John Deere's price for just the frame is $77! I'm making 4 or 6 more bags so that when I gather leaves in the fall I can fill a utility cart with them and only make a trip down to the woods every 6 bags.

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