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I have looked through many of the posts. Many of them look to be dated more than a year ago. Looking for updated information and experiences.

I have found a reconditioned jig welded Ford 9" with proper perch locations and pinion angle/offset for 1969 Camaro. Can anyone already running a Ford 9" describe their experiences with them. I have heard the gears are noisy, true? Are there any problems or issues to look for?

I am currently evaluating a built GM 8.5 10 bolt, GM 12 bolt, and the Ford 9". Any input of feedback would be appreciated.

I am looking for day to day experiences related to each of these rear ends as their pricing is within a couple of hundred dollars when similarly geared. I am not building a drag car, but would like to invest my money in the right places for the right equipment.

Thanks,
69DFW
 

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The 9 inch is the strongest, and has the most available gear sets that I have found. Pretty easy to change gears compared to the GM rears, although someone proficient with the GM stuff can get ti done reasonably quick. The Ford unit already has an axle containment system in case an axle breaks..the GM doesn't.

The upside to the GM rears is that you aren't cross breeding parts, the resale value should be more, and the 12 bolt takes a bit less power to turn.

The axles on most 9 inch rears are bigger than the GM, will handle more power.

If the gears are set up properly they shouldn't make much noise.
 

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I have looked through many of the posts. Many of them look to be dated more than a year ago. Looking for updated information and experiences.

I have found a reconditioned jig welded Ford 9" with proper perch locations and pinion angle/offset for 1969 Camaro. Can anyone already running a Ford 9" describe their experiences with them. I have heard the gears are noisy, true? Are there any problems or issues to look for?

I am currently evaluating a built GM 8.5 10 bolt, GM 12 bolt, and the Ford 9". Any input of feedback would be appreciated.

I am looking for day to day experiences related to each of these rear ends as their pricing is within a couple of hundred dollars when similarly geared. I am not building a drag car, but would like to invest my money in the right places for the right equipment.

Thanks,
69DFW
I've been running a 9" in my '69 since the late 90's. Properly setup they do not make noise. The original 9" that I installed was from a '67 Mustang and had 3.73 gears with a limited slip diff. After swapping the perches and re-drilling the bolt pattern it was a direct bolt in. The rear cost $200, swapping the perches cost about $100, and re-drilling cost $100. This stock 28 spline 9" rear worked fine when my car ran mid 12's at 110MPH.

The 9" under my car now is all aftermarket parts.
 

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I am under the same predicament right now... Im hearing if you are goin to buy new or atleast spend a good amount of money on a rear, go ahead and get the 9" as it is stronger. My Camaro is not original and has many custom touches, so Im thinking it doesnt matter for resale if I stay GM.
 

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Matt,

If you are going to go new the GM stuff might be cheaper...and if using an aftermarket housing the GM style rear may be as strong or stronger than the Ford.

My initial post to you was in regards to using OEM equipment.
 

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A 9" is not needed for going to shows and cruise-ins.
A 8.5" ,12 bolt ,or 9" will all work fine up to about 500-600HP (maybe more?)
Any axle will break if abused...it's just when will it happen.

I have a 12 bolt with all Moser internals (spool,35spline axles,c-clip eliminators) I shouldn't be able to break :noway:...But if I get stupid....if can happen.
 

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A 9 inch for will not make any noise if it is set up correctly. These rear ends were used in the high priced Ford, Lincoln and Mercury cars in the '60 and '70, so noise would not be tolerated in those cars. I believe that the correct 12 bolt would make your Camaro worth a little more, and would be plenty strong for a street car. The 8.5 is also a good rear end when built right.
 

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... I believe that the correct 12 bolt would make your Camaro worth a little more, and would be plenty strong for a street car. The 8.5 is also a good rear end when built right.
:yes: what he said :thumbsup:

A nice 12-bolt will add value to almost any Camaro!
 

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I'd say I'd lean towards keeping all GM. The 9" are good and can be bulletproof but anyone can break anything. IMO a 8.5" 10 bolt are good for 95% of all street cars out there. they are plentiful and reasonable.
 

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Great feedback. I have found a period correct stock numbers matching 12 bolt from a 69 camaro with posit. I could not determine if that *** preferable to say a Ford 9" for the same cost. I could not determine the "value" added by the 12 bolt. The vote so far seems to be 50/50 based on current responses. Keep the feedback coming.

Thanks,
69DFW
 

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Scott,

I will add that if you can find a 9 inch in a Lincoln you might score the factory disc brakes that were common on them. Ford made millions of 9 inch rears, lots in Furd trucks and Lincolns, LTDs....etc
 

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Go for the 12 bolt. :thumbsup: An 8.5 is also fine for most cars.

I believe a 9 inch from a Lincoln Versailles, Ford Granada or Mercury Monarch from roughly the years 1975 to 1980 will be close to direct bolt in. But make sure it is a 9 inch.
 

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First as to strength the Ford nine inch as found under most cars is weaker than the 12 bolt. Only the nodular iron cases found under high performance Mustangs are as strong as the nodular iron case used on ALL GM cars (even your wimpy 10 bolt has a nodular iron case). The stock Ford nine inch uses the same 28 spline axles as the Spicer ten bolt rear does (except for the pressed on bearings on the end which hold it in place). Which makes the standard axles weaker than the 30 spline axles used in the 12 bolt. Only the high performance Mustang rear end came with the high performance 31 spline axle. Finally most trucks heavier than a F150 didn't even use the nine inch rear because it was too weak for Ford motor company to waste their time on. They used a Dana rear end (your Spicer rear end is a Dana rear end as it is the same company and uses the same design, differing only in name). I recommend a Dana 60 if you are worried about a strong, light, rear that doesn't waste power. (just think of it as a heavy duty ten bolt rear).

Second there is a better gear selection for a Ford nine inch thanks to circle track racing. But do you really need a gear set that is only five hundredths more or less than the proceeding gear ratio when most drivers can not tell a two tenths difference in a final gear ratio when pressed? You will not need 90% of the gear ratios offered for a nine inch as there is no difference in performance from one to the other unless you are racing 500 miles with a single tank of gas on a Saturday afternoon. As to set up they all go together the same way. One uses a spanner nut with only one carrier, Spicer (Dana) uses steel shims with three different carriers to do the same job in a 12 bolt rear or a Dana 60.

Third a nine inch costs more than the original purchase money. It eats your horsepower which it converts into heat in the rear gear oil. You will loose three percent of your horsepower to a nine inch that you could use to push your car down the road or save in terms of wasted gas. A nine inch is very inefficient with it's low pinion angle to engage more tooth area for it's vaunted strength which results in higher frictional looses.

Finally no rear end makes any noise if set up correctly; except a Ford banjo style rear end out of a Model A that the roundy round guys love to use in place of the Ford nine inch called a Quick Change rear. It makes noise because the gears are straight cut not helical, as in modern cars.

Larger Dave
 

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I have found a period correct stock numbers matching 12 bolt from a 69 camaro with posit.
Numbers matching means it is the original rearend that was installed at the factory. If your car did not come from the factory with this specific rearend, it will not be numbers matching.
 

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First as to strength the Ford nine inch as found under most cars is weaker than the 12 bolt. ...

... a nine inch costs more than the original purchase money. ...

Larger Dave
:yes: - what he said :thumbsup:

And I have several stock cases with the pinion front support bearing either 'spit-out' or the cases cracked from folks trying to prove otherwise ;)

Trying to build a performance/competition 9" with any factory parts is more often than not a complete waste of money ... it's gonna break :p
Always include a case, spool/carrier, gear set, bearings, axles and other parts as mandatory items for reliability with anything over 400HP or a vehicle with any 'hook' at all ...

... If your car did not come from the factory with this specific rearend, it will not be numbers matching.
:noway: but ... it could be 'Date Correct' :thumbsup:
 

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The Moser 12 bolt is quite a bit stronger than the original Chevy 12 bolt, and you can get it any way you want it. You can even get it slightly narrower or wider if you want. They had a price increase on Jan 1st, so they are a little more expensive than before.
 

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from a mechanics point of view i have worked on chevy rears and ford 9 inch and ford 9 inch is by far easier to work on and set up . you can pull the pinion and pinion housing out and work on it or adjust shims without removing the pumpkin or axles . and backlash adjustment is a breeze with the screw adjusters compared to shims ? jmo.. so easy to change carriers from spool to posi or open due to the fact you only have to reset backlash . i dont know which one is stronger im sure with enough money any rear could be bullitt proof but i would take a ford 9 inch any day they hit the nail on the head when they designed it they should all be that easy to work on .
 
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