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Discussion Starter #1
I am in the process of redoing my standard interior of my 67 camaro rs. I am having a hard time with the bottom of the front bucket seats. Is it easier to hog ring the inside seam down while the cover is off the seat or after the cover is one the seat in which you would do from underneath. I have the cover on but it will not look right until I get the inner seam pulled down. Any suggestions? Hints? Tricks? I am on the first one and already I am wanting to look for an upholstery shop. :(

Kevin
 

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Hi
You have to do the inner hold-downs first. Turn the seat cover inside-out and position it over the seat bun so it is right where it should be. Then hog ring the inner hold-downs. Then 'roll' the seat cover down over the seat. This part is made easier by spraying silicone spray on the vinyl and foam, and doing it while the cover is warm and pliable. The back rests are done the in the same manner.
 

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It will also help once you have the inner seams done if you have someone else compress the foam while you pull the vinyl up over the frame and complete the install. You can do it by yourself but you sure can work up a sweat. I have done it both ways and having a helper keeps you from getting worn out and helps you keep your sanity. Make sure you do this on a clean sheet or blanket. I use some old wool army blankets that I have.
 

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Kevin,
I am looking for someone to jump ship with me. I got tired of trying use hogrings and I ended up using large thick industrial zip ties. They worked smooth. People on the board are concerned that they are too weak and will break. I will let people know how many years it takes. I have a topic on zips vs hogrings about 3-4weeks ago. look under new interiors at the site below.

http://photos.yahoo.com/dukemd66

Rick
 

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Ya know Duke, since I took a bucket apart and got a good look at how the inside seam gets attached to the springs, I have a much better idea of what you meant in that first thread.
I don't think it'll be a problem at all holding the inner seam rods on with good zips.
I'm not as concerned about it as I was before.

I dread just the thought of getting those seams held on with anything! :eek: Do the rods fit pretty well through the buns so you're not hunting too much? I suppose the best place to start attaching them to the seat springs is in the front and center, working around towards the back.
 

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HSJ,
I made sure that the foam inner seam and the inner rod lined up. I then attached the foam to the inner rods using two zips in the front and two on each side. I snugged these down pretty good but not all the way.

I then took the cover (inside out) and placed the "attachment strip of cloth" in the foam seam to look for alignment. I took an exacto knife and made two 1cm cuts in the foam seam and I made a small cut about in the middle of my attachment strip. I took an 11" zip put it through the small hole in the cloth and then threaded the zip through the cuts in the foam. The pointed end of the zip slides right through the burlap. The head end of the zip is a little more cumbersome. Push it through the foam and against the burlap. Sometimes it came right through other time I took the exacto and made small cuts in the burlap against the head and it would pop through. I made sure that the zip was on each side of the rod and I loosely zipped it. I started in the front middle and worked around each side going about 2" apart. This distance decreased my "dimpling" that happened on the first time I did this.

After I had all of the inner seam zips in place I aligned the attachment cloth in the seam and snugged the zips down so that the cloth was in the seam. I then pulled the cover over the edges. I did not have any problems doing this. Once I was happy with how things looked I put a few zips on the outer edge of the cover and zipped it to the frame. Dont use the zip to pull the cover to the final point...it will tear. Put the zip through, pull cover with one hand and tighted the zip down with the other.

Then the part I liked the most, I started to pull the zips of the inner seam a little tighter and tighter until I liked the contour I had. I just started in the middle and kept going around. I sat on the cushion and the zips loosened a little and I pulled again until the contour was stable.

I think it will work fine. I will be working on more of my interior after I get my subframe back together over the next few weeks.
I will post pics.

Rick
 

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Thanks Rick.

I've been taking a lot of pics of my re-upholstery project as well. I'm putting the whole thing together in text and pics on my site as I procede.

But I hit a snag with the back seat so it's on hold until this weekend when the new one shows up. And my bucket buns weren't as salvageable as I thought they were so I'm waiting on Mr. Piggy Bank to fatten up so I can get new front buns. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the information! I plan on continuing to do it myself and hopefully it will get easier. In your opinion was the front buckets the toughest to reupholster or is the back seat? I am doing the back seat next. :rolleyes: I will try and post some pictures as I go and hopefully I will have a new interior come spring time. Again thanks for your help and have a good holiday


Kevin
 

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By far, the rear seat will be easier.
That's why I started with the headrests and then the rear.

The rear is just straight forward... no inner seams to attach to the seat springs like the seam around the bucket bottoms.

The hardest part was running the rods through the extra fabric along the long length of the new upholstery... especially the back of the bottom portion. It's got that huge curve in it in the middle.

For the rest of the rods in all of the seats (they're all wrapped with 35 year old paper), I found clothes hangers that are covered in plastic. Not the kind that are gooped in a plastic or rubber like that goop you can dip your tool grips in, but hangers that have a plastic 'jacket' on them.

I took all of the rods out of the old upholstery, cut the plastic covered hanger to match, and used that in their place. I figured, the plastic covering the metal part of the hanger can 'move', sort of like the original paper did on the original rods. That way they won't wear out as easy as a coating that's attached to the metal of the hanger itself, and won't tear.
It worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That sounds like a great idea HwyStarJoe. Where did you find these coat hangers with the plastic jacket on them? Sounds like thats the way to go.
 

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I get them when I have my uniforms pressed.
I'm sure if you shopped around you could find similar type hangers. I have to look for some more myself, so I'll let you know if I find them at a nation-wide type source.
I like the idea of using covered wires\rods. If I can't find duplicates, I'll find a suitable substitute.

The only thing I worry about with using them is that the hanger is probably a lot stiffer than the original piano wire wrapped in paper. But I also thought that it would be easier to shape any curves in the seats using the hanger wire.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Man I am having a hard time with postioning the inside seam. I attached it several times but for some reason its not looking that great. The cover has creases in it and it doesnt look straight so I will have to remove the hogrings and start over. There's got to be an easier way to do this.
 

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As long as you get the seams attached evenly on both sides with enough hog rings to reduce the bulges, It will look much better when you pull the front and sides over the bun. Everything will come together. Don't forget to put new burlap over the springs for the front and rear seats. The burlap keeps the foam from disintegrating from the friction against the springs. I did the seats in the 69, 75 and 93, They all turned out great.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think the most trouble I am having is that the seat foam I purchased just has the valleys for the sides and not the front. Should I cut out a valley in the front of the cushion so that it is easier to hogring to the seat spring? I don't want to take a chance and ruin the seat foam.
 

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heres a trick I learned from an upholstery shop.
dont spray silicon on the foam.
instead get a goot 3 ply garbage bag and slip it over the foam.
also to make slipping the cover on get a vacum and suck all the air out of the bag .
this will compress the foam .
this makes it much easier to install the covers.
 
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