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Discussion Starter #1
I have an original deluxe interior. On the back portion of the rear seat, the 90 deg. stiched seam that goes from the top corner to the white inset trim has let go. I assume the thread has just rotted. I talked to a local upolstery guy who told me he can restitch it with no problem, but this will create more needle holes and perferations in the fabric and the fabric will eventually rip away from the seam. This does make sense to me, but what else can I do? I want the seam restitched, but I don't want the original interior compromised by the material ripping. Maybe he's just covering his rear end incase it lets go? Any suggestions?
 

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Sics: Have you ever hand stiched a seam? Sounds like a workable solution, but never done it before and want it to look professional. Is there a special needle to use? The seam is about 3-4" long.
 

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Assuming the vinyl is not dry-rotted and hard, you should be able to repair it. If the shop doesn't want to try it, you could probably hand-stitch it. Best to take the cover off frame, and sew it from the back side. You can buy U-shaped needles, so grab one of them about 2 or 3 inches across and go to town. Use a fairly heavy weight thread the same color as the vinyl. Just sew in the old holes, and it should turn out fine.
 

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Yes, I've made repairs using this method before and you would absolutely have to remove the cover first. If the seam won't show after it's repaired I would use kevlar fishing line. You can get a heavy duty curved upholstery needle at most fabric stores. If the seam is exposed, get heavy duty upholstery thread. Some stores don't carry this so you may need to beg for the appropriate color from a local upholstery shop.
 

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It takes a curved needle that looks like an exagerated fish hook at the sharp end. Also, go to a fabrics shop and get a really thick gauged thread. If you have ever looked at the hands of a professional upholsterer you will see they have super rough and caloused hands like an old fisherman. To do more than a couple inches of in-place stitching takes incredible finger/hand strength as it is tough to use a thimble with that type of curved needle. It might be worth paying a professional just to watch and learn his technique. Take a six-pack with you and keep it visible while he is working and maybe he'll just settle for the beer?
 

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if your going to remove cover might as well just replace with a new one?
itll suck if the repair doesnt hold and all the time wasted.
my wife is a tailor and does leather etc. and said that if the seams are going there they will go elsewhere aswell.
so youll have to resew the entire seat to make the repair permanent.
or replace the cover with a new one which is cheaper and better looking in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Dawg: My dilema is that this is an all original interior (except for the carpet) so I want to keep the original upolstery as long as possible. It is in extremely good shape with no tears or cracks (only 39k orig miles) except for the stitched seam has let go. Thanks guys, off to buy a needle!!
 
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