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Discussion Starter #1
I installed a new Retro sound model one radio in my 70 big block Camaro. One wire from the fuse panel acc, one from the fuse panel bat, and one to ground. The radio worked for a week and then died and will not power on. I returned it to retrosound and they sent me a new radio. I tested the power wires from the fuse panel with a volt meter and they are providing the correct power. The new radio powered up and worked for a week and then it died. In both cases after the radios died they would sometimes turn on for about 10 seconds and then die. What the heck is going on? All my connections are good.
 

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That's why I deal with Woodradios. He does not use the inferior internal components the others do. His prices are higher but the quality of his units reflects it. Send him your core or he'll provide the unit. He also purchases radios if you have something he needs. Perhaps there is someone else who provides a quality unit but I am unaware of them. http://www.woodradios.com/
 

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Check your charging system voltage under a variety of conditions such as 1) sitting idle 2) running down the road 3) after a hot cruise. If you've got a voltage regulator problem you may see one of these 3 tests showing more than 14.5V or so system voltage. Depending on how well made the guts are, it may not like that -- Mallory ignition modules are prime examples of voltage intolerant devices.
 

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Check your charging system voltage under a variety of conditions such as 1) sitting idle 2) running down the road 3) after a hot cruise. If you've got a voltage regulator problem you may see one of these 3 tests showing more than 14.5V or so system voltage. Depending on how well made the guts are, it may not like that -- Mallory ignition modules are prime examples of voltage intolerant devices.
That's what caused my first Retro radio to die...16 volts at 2000 rpm's.
 

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Check your charging system voltage under a variety of conditions such as 1) sitting idle 2) running down the road 3) after a hot cruise. If you've got a voltage regulator problem you may see one of these 3 tests showing more than 14.5V or so system voltage. Depending on how well made the guts are, it may not like that -- Mallory ignition modules are prime examples of voltage intolerant devices.
That's what caused my first Retro radio to die...16 volts at 2000 rpm's.
Had a Harrison radio and a spike burned out the inline fuse and the module on the hot lead. The radio still worked after bypassing the module. Besides being an inferior unit with horrific sound, it's another reeason I prefer to use a quality unit built by someone who sets their standards higher than others.
 

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JT,

Thanks for the post, please contact our Tech manager, Chris Peterson about your issues Monday--- ([email protected] 888-325-1555 ), we always recommend that installers use a volt meter to check voltage at idle, revving or at rest. We are very proactive about our tech support and are very detailed in our responses, I concur with the overvoltage / possible bad regulator scenario mentioned by some of the previous posters, if you're on your second radio, this warrants some immediate tech intervention. over voltage is common and believe it or not, we've seen reverse polarity on batteries, and also MSD/Pertronix ignitions interfering with the vehicle ground systems--- older cars present lots of challenges with 12 volt electronics, however we are happy to help overcome your issues and make this right for you.

many thanks,

Michael Robbins
Product manager
www.retrosoundusa.com
 

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Discussion Starter #9
JT,

Thanks for the post, please contact our Tech manager, Chris Peterson about your issues Monday--- ([email protected] 888-325-1555 ), we always recommend that installers use a volt meter to check voltage at idle, revving or at rest. We are very proactive about our tech support and are very detailed in our responses, I concur with the overvoltage / possible bad regulator scenario mentioned by some of the previous posters, if you're on your second radio, this warrants some immediate tech intervention. over voltage is common and believe it or not, we've seen reverse polarity on batteries, and also MSD/Pertronix ignitions interfering with the vehicle ground systems--- older cars present lots of challenges with 12 volt electronics, however we are happy to help overcome your issues and make this right for you.

many thanks,

Michael Robbins
Product manager
www.retrosoundusa.com
Turns out that I see some AC current in the wires coming from the fuse panel. I made another post about this issue. But basically the BAT and ACC from the fuse panel have some AC currnet readings. I think this is the problem. DC voltage is always between 12 and 14 at off, idle, and 2500 rpm.
 

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Turns out I think I can solder a low pass capacitor across the power leads to remove the unwanted AC noise:

One frequent application of the capacitive low-pass filter principle is in the design of circuits having components or sections sensitive to electrical “noise.” As mentioned at the beginning of the last chapter, sometimes AC signals can “couple” from one circuit to another via capacitance (Cstray) and/or mutual inductance (Mstray) between the two sets of conductors. A prime example of this is unwanted AC signals (“noise”) becoming impressed on DC power lines supplying sensitive circuits:

Noise is coupled by stray capacitance and mutual inductance into “clean” DC power.

After coupling with the AC noise source via stray mutual inductance and stray capacitance, though, the voltage as measured at the load terminals is now a mix of AC and DC, the AC being unwanted. Normally, one would expect the radio load to be precisely identical to power source, because the uninterrupted conductors connecting them should make the two sets of points electrically common. However, power conductor impedance allows the two voltages to differ, which means the noise magnitude can vary at different points in the DC system.

If we wish to prevent such “noise” from reaching the DC load, all we need to do is connect a low-pass filter near the load to block any coupled signals. In its simplest form, this is nothing more than a capacitor connected directly across the power terminals of the load, the capacitor behaving as a very low impedance to any AC noise, and shorting it out. Such a capacitor is called a decoupling capacitor.


Decoupling capacitor, applied to load, filters noise from DC power supply.

A cursory glance at a crowded printed-circuit board (PCB) will typically reveal decoupling capacitors scattered throughout, usually located as close as possible to the sensitive DC loads. Capacitor size is usually 0.1 µF or more, a minimum amount of capacitance needed to produce a low enough impedance to short out any noise. Greater capacitance will do a better job at filtering noise, but size and economics limit decoupling capacitors to meager values.
 
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