Team Camaro Tech banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,375 Posts
Good question! I had to THINK what a standard chain looks like. It's been that long! I don't know of too many folks using them anymore.
That should tell you what you may want to know.
A standard chain is made of many steel-stamped and identical pieces of material that are riveted together. Translation: CHEAP. If you find one, put it in the recycle bin.
Oh, here's a look at my Cloyes true-roller chain. (did I spell that right?)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,496 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,244 Posts
I won't go with anything but Cloyes.

When I got my 1st gen, I yarded those timing gears out of it and put in this Cloyes.

IMO- The car would seem to glide after that. When I was driving the car with the timing gears in it, everytime I let off the gas it felt like I was gearing down.

I had a Ford Tempo; I put 346k miles on it!! It was running well and then one day it wouldn't come up to speed.
So I sold it to a mechanic who fixed it cheap with some hose that was collapsing and it ran fine after that.
I asked him why a little economy sedan would go so long like that and he showed me an engine out of one. It used a timing chain and not a timing belt which is what a lot of 4 bangers did.
Plus, it looked like a roller chain to me. A small one but it looked like a roller.

Now that mechanic's daughter drives that car to college.
Ford should put that in a museum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
Mark a lot of the stock gear sets used nylon on the gears, this results in high wear and obviously breakage. The double rollers that you see at the bottom end prices aren't much better than the standard chains as far as how quickly they stretch. What you want to run is the Tru-roller chains, much heavier links than the cheap double roller and they don't stretch nearly as much as the cheap double roller or stock set ups.

They are a little more money, but it's worth it. A lot of people confuse the double roller with the tru-roller, but they are different in regards to the construction of the links and rollers. Spend a couple extra bucks and get a tru-roller from Cloyes.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
33,287 Posts
The standard timing chain along with the nylon camshaft sprocket gives a quiet operating drive set-up as designed by the General for a quiet engine.

Rollers make a concernible noise, but not near the amount of noise from a gear drive.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,341 Posts
Imho, the best is GM's old nylon toothed set w/ the "link-belt" chain!!

But you have to watch it b/c as it ages, the nylon gets brittle and can shear teeth off!

It's the best b/c the nylon dampen's the harmonic's between the crank and cam so that the cam stay's phased better at speed.

pdq67
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So what does the newer rollers give you compared to the old standard belt??

I would assume that they hold their length better to lessen stretch. But will they last longer? How many timing chains have broken??? If im planning a street/strip 489 motor, that would most likely once its together not be taken apart again, what would be suggested.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,920 Posts
The Tru-roller has rollers that actually rotate compared to the double roller which does not. Cloyes claims the Tru-roller stretchs less, has less friction and is good for as much as 10hp increase. I don't know how they came up with those power claims, but that sounds like a lot to me.

I have taken apart a sbc after approximately 100 run time and found the new Cloyes double roller to have stretched already and another at 500 miles and found it too to have some play in it. The Tru-roller that just came out of my 355 appeared to have almost no stretch and it's probably had several summers of limited use on it. Can't say for sure because I didn't build it, it was in the car when I bought it. I know I drove it about 1500 miles this summer before I tore it down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So, PDQ67, is that what you run in your motors? Just a standard ol tried and true standard chain? Would you run a roller in any case?

The whole 10 hp gain is all probably hocus pocus.. I did read a mag article somewhere where they dynoed a motor with a roller, a gear drive and a high priced belt set up.. the belt motor made a 10 hp gain only over the roller. The gear was somewhere in the middle 5-6 hp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,305 Posts
with age, the stock nylon gears get brittle and fall apart.
but that usually takes a LONG time to happen. the GM engineers put that setup in a LOT of high performance vehicles they sold only after doing some pretty rigorous torture testing.
i've seen some decent "true rollers" that people spent a lot of $$ on stretch a decent amount after a couple of summers and a few thousand miles, and i've seen stock nylon gears and chains that looked new after 100,000 miles.
the only reason i've never put in a new stock nylon timing set in anything is because i don't think anyone makes them anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,163 Posts
the mylar t/c that the general made did its job well, but it bit me pretty bad...i was heading to long island from ct...(about 200 miles from home)about 130 miles in, the oil pressure was gradually dropping, and by the time i got to the inlaws, i had 10 lbs at speed...i pulled the pan and cleaned all of the timing gear parts out of the pick-up, and got pressure back, until about 10 miles from home, where it plugged back up...this time, solid...i lost the motor...305 though, so it gave me the reason to replace the engine...and the wife couldnt argue to boot...(she`s always bitching if i fix something thats not broke)lmao...
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top