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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a 1969 Z-11 and it has a date coded rosewood steering wheel.. First of all I was surprised the wheel was not "real" rosewood, but plastic and also the wheel is cracked through to the medal rim in 3 different places. Should I get this repaired, or is it more valuable to keep it the way it is. If a repair is in order, can you recommend a vender for this repair.
 

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The authentic GM 'wood' wheels (both walnut and rosewood) are plastic, not real wood. Grant and maybe some of the other aftermarket wood wheels use real wood, but they don't look anything like the GM wheels. Cracked fake wood wheels are more common than the uncracked ones. I posted a question on this forum a few months ago asking why they are so prone to cracking. Got some interesting responses. I can't imagine that a nicely done repaired wheel is less desireable than a cracked one. I know that a few reputable repair outfits have been listed in previous posts. You can do a search on the topic or wait until someone with a better memory than mine chimes in.
 

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Gary's link is actually - http://www.garyssteeringwheel.com/

I found this article a while back and the guy has some good ideas and got a pretty good result with his processes - http://classicoldsmobile.com/forums...7-eddie-hansens-69-cutlass-convertible-5.html

I haven't had the need or opportunity to try it out on a wheel yet, but did do a project based on some of this info (and pigments from 'TAP' Plastics) to do a repair for a family friend and was able to mix some pretty good color matches with little problem.
I just found a good 'base' color blend slightly lighter than the piece and then adjusted the color swirls to match the original as best I could - it came out very nice after a final spray clear-coat.
Here is a link to the TAP stuff I used - http://www.tapplastics.com/product/fiberglass/resin_fillers_dyes/tap_premium_pigments/50
The small jars are reasonably priced (@$3~4)and you can mix and match with very little use of each (except maybe the 'base' color you decide on).

Sending a wheel 'out' to one of the repair guys - like Gary - for rework can get pricey - figure at least $250~350 - for a minor job in my past experiences ...

Hope this gives you a few ideas to go on.
 
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