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Removed backlite/rear glass last night. The window channel has minor rust. Feel somewhat lucky after reading the horror stories. 1 pinhole top right 3" down, one pea-size hole bottom right 12" in toward center, and one smaller hole bottom left 2" in toward center. There are occassional rough areas due to rust trying to form in the channel. Don't think Pro15 is the solution. WHAT about using a dremmel tool with wire brush to get the entire channel/trough shinny, plug holes with tiny pieces of resin soaked fiberglass matting, and paint thin coats of fiberglass resin with fibers in it over the entire surface of the channel to make it impervious to future water damage? Sand smooth, apply epoxy primer, paint, install clips, apply butyl tape to glass and position, put molding on? :confused:Chevy Chase
 

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Are you a boater? That's how I would do a repair on my sailboat. When my car was eleven years old I found rust similar to yours. I cleaned it up as best I could. I don't remember the details because the year was 1980. But to cover the entire area and prevent a recurrence I used JB Weld. To this day the repair is perfect.
One thing. This design traps water in the window channel. (I assume you have a first gen) At both sides (the low point) I installed drains. Two short pieces of 1/4" copper tube were placed at each end of the bottom channel. I flared the ends to form a funnel. Then drilled corresponding holes in the channel. The tubes were pushed into the fresh JB Weld so as to be level with the goop. After the product kicked I connected vinyl tube to the nipples inside the trunk. Then drilled holes into the top of the wheel wells and inserted the tubing. It's snug. (I don't drive in the rain so it doesn't have to be snug) The result is not only the chance of recurring rust greatly reduced but those annoying water trickles on the top of your rear deck after a wash are eliminated. Go for it. It's stood the test of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanx Fred! And yes I have repaird boats w/fiberglass. My Camaro is a 1968.I wasn't sure about JB Weld. Do you coat the entire channel/trough with JB Weld and then a coat of epoxy primer, then paint to match car. Or, leave the JB Weld bare and put backlite/glass back on? Will epoxy primer stick to JB Weld? Is JB Weld sandable? Thanx for your help!:confused:
 

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All good questions. Wish I was sure what to tell you. I know JB Weld IS epoxy. It needs no coating in this application. And it's sand-able and file-able. Just like aluminum only a little softer. Think of Marine Tex. And I coated the entire channel. No sense asking for trouble later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Fred, Thanx again for the advice. By the way, nice 34' Hunter. I love sail boats/yachts. Came close once to a 50' Gulfstar but the wife wanted a land house. Your idea about the drain tube is brilliant. I got the material to do it. JB Weld probably adheres better to copper than fiberglass. So I will go with JB in the channel since your camaro has stood the test of time with JB. I should mention I got Jim's (Sr Tech) vote of confidence on the fiberglass w/resin. Thanx Jim! Why didn't GM install the drains? I'm the curious type and would love to do the left side with fiberglass and the right side with JB Weld to see which holds up better. But... I don't think the two are compatible and failure would occur where they join each other. :noway:
 

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Terry, the JB weld sounds like a good idea. I just wanted to let you know,that I have had good results cleaning the channel the way you discribe and instead of resin use POR 15 to wet out the fine fiber glass cloth.And Fred the tubing sounds like a great idea, I may try that one also.
 

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Thanks for the nice comments Terry. And I'm sure they aren't compatible until after they KICK. Wouldn't that be a fun experiment?! Just like High School science!
 

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Fiberglass Fiber & Resin is not a good idea as it eventually separates from metal. Epoxy on the other hand works great for pin holes in window channels and even for weak areas along the enclosure corners. The area has to be well prepared using Lacquer thinner then sand blasted to ensure good adhesion. I've not used JB Weld but if it's epoxy with a metal filler then it should do the job. I've used Lepages 12 hour White/Black Tube successively for this type of repair and Generic Epoxy Brands for Metal labeled "A" + "B" to repair seams weakened by rust but not bad enough to replace. In all cases I will shoot the repaired area with Epoxy Undercoat before and after using the epoxy filler. I've an 84 Volvo patched around the windshield in this manner some 20 years ago and it's OK today.
 

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Since we're talking about boats and cars here, Ill vote for the JB. I bought a Century Raven 11 years ago that the 305 Chev block had frozen and cracked in. It was only cracked externally and I used a wire wheel on my drill and applied JB weld to it. It was cracked on both sides. Since there is no pressure to speak of in the water jacket, it has held up great....not a drop of water has escaped or a line of rust from seepage in 11 years. Now for the crack in the exhaust manifold, it didn't last long, I believe, due to the hight heat there. The water doesn't run out, but it will seep and steam while running.

I have much worse rust damage in my rear window channel and bought a cheap hand held sand blaster to clean it and am planning to JB weld it too. I will use the drain tube idea, as it sounds great. Not an "original" repair, but a common sense one....:thumbsup:
 

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Fiberglass Fiber & Resin is not a good idea as it eventually separates from metal. Epoxy on the other hand works great for pin holes in window channels and even for weak areas along the enclosure corners. The area has to be well prepared using Lacquer thinner then sand blasted to ensure good adhesion. I've not used JB Weld but if it's epoxy with a metal filler then it should do the job. I've used Lepages 12 hour White/Black Tube successively for this type of repair and Generic Epoxy Brands for Metal labeled "A" + "B" to repair seams weakened by rust but not bad enough to replace. In all cases I will shoot the repaired area with Epoxy Undercoat before and after using the epoxy filler. I've an 84 Volvo patched around the windshield in this manner some 20 years ago and it's OK today.
I've never seen properly applied fiberglass and resin separate from metal and I've used it many times for many years. The only problem is that it's not flexible. So if you use it on something that flexes it will crack. JB Weld is good stuff, but I'm not sure it's flexible either.
 

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For minor holes and areas that can be cleaned of any remaining rust a good product to use is called "all-metal". It's made by U.S. Chemical & plastics (USC). It should be available at any body shop supply or automotive paint supply house. It is like working with bondo but it is actually metal. Sands well, is tough like metal and can be drilled in to accept the little studs that hold the molding clips in place for the window molding. I would vote for that any day instead of the fibreglass repairs which are messy, require multiple applications and are not strong enough to be drilled in. Hope that helps.
 

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Fred, Thanx again for the advice. By the way, nice 34' Hunter. I love sail boats/yachts. Came close once to a 50' Gulfstar but the wife wanted a land house. Your idea about the drain tube is brilliant. I got the material to do it. JB Weld probably adheres better to copper than fiberglass. So I will go with JB in the channel since your camaro has stood the test of time with JB. I should mention I got Jim's (Sr Tech) vote of confidence on the fiberglass w/resin. Thanx Jim! Why didn't GM install the drains? I'm the curious type and would love to do the left side with fiberglass and the right side with JB Weld to see which holds up better. But... I don't think the two are compatible and failure would occur where they join each other. :noway:
Fisher Body used four sacrifical zinc anodes in the rear window channel. two located at the lower left & two at the lower right. I still have the four that came with my car. You need to keep them bare metal so-to-speak in order for them to work. Mine got painted over & had 40-years of build-up so they were not working as designed. Only have two small pin hole though. I will clean them & reinstall when the window is reinstalled. They install on the studs. I can post pictures of what they look like if you want?
 

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I know a guy that did the drain tubing about 17 years ago, and it's still perfect. I've mentioned this same type of repair to people, and they think I'm crazy. I'm restoring my fo car for a second time and you can bet I will be adding drains. Especially since I just put new metal on the back end.
 

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Why not cut out the rust and replace it with good metal? This is my first restoration and felt really comfortable doing it. I think the results turned out great. I don't have any pics uploaded right now, but should be able to get some later this evening.
It was very simple to do and only took a few hours to do it right.
 

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Another option if you are not comfortable welding might be to cut it out and glue in new metal patches with a good quality two part panel adhesive. The joints are as strong as welds and it helps seal out moisture to prevent further rust.

Don
 

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Heres a little bit about bending up some sheet metal, with out a sheet metal brake, just hand tools.

Then you could weld in some pieces or use the panel bond like somebody mentioned. Anyway, for what its worth.

http://www.1969supersport.com/sheetmetal.html

Rob
 
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