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Discussion Starter #1
I'm working on my fiance's 66 Buick convertible-here's the deal.The car had a windshield leak (go figure-a 40 year old convertible that leaks!) and the fusebox was getting wet to the point where nothing was working anymore.I fixed the leak but now I'm scratching my head trying to remove the rust from the fusebox.I was able to get the box off the firewall but am reluctant to pull the fuse holders out because I've been causing minor damage to the box.What I've been doing is swabbing Naval Jelly into the fuse holders with a cotton swab and rinsing it with a spray bottle.This is only marginally working.I would much rather use some sort of abrasive that I could rotate in the fuse holder to clean the rust off.Has anyone else had this problem or can offer some suggestions to get this cleaned up?
 

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Personally, I would use (and have used) a good quality steel wool to clean the holders. I just wrap some around a thin screw driver, and clean them up that way. Then use compressed air to blow them out, and make sure you don't have stray steel wool fibers all over the box. If you need to, use electrical contact cleaner (spray can with tube) to further clean them, but be careful because it could remove the lettering (if the naval jelly hasn't already).

Take some pictures or draw a diagram, in case you do end up wiping some of the lettering off during cleaning.
 

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My Camaro had the same issue when I bought it. I used my dremel and a couple different wire wheels on it, and a little sandpaper by hand. Once I had each one of them good and clean, I used a little Q tip with some stuff we use at work (I'm an Electrician) on electrical terminations called "Kopr-shield" made by Thomas & Betts, all it is is a conductive anti corrosive paste like antisieze with copper in it. I carefully dabbed it on each termination, put in new fuses and never looked back. I actually used the Kopr-shield on all my terminations that were getting crusty. You can get it at most any electrical supply house by the way.
Don't use anything like navel jelly, it just creates a film on the already not-to-conductive rust, and you further lose conductivity. Just clean the heck out of them to rust free metal, and if you can find a conductive coating use a bit of that, and you should not have further issues. Good luck with it!
 

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now I'm scratching my head trying to remove the rust from the fusebox.I was able to get the box off the firewall but am reluctant to pull the fuse holders out because I've been causing minor damage to the box
.

If you look ver close u will see a very little slot...dowqn inside is a little lug attached to the fuse holder...pulling back on the holder this lug expands.
If u slide a very small screw driver of welding wire down, it closes the luyg and the fuse holder falls out

When replacing bend the lug just tight enough for it to slide in with slight friction, there is enough spring in uit to flick back in place again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the replies.I finished this project today.I wound up pulling all the fuse holders out of the box,one at a time.I knew about the little clips holding them in but some of them were a real bear to get out.Some of those suckers have 6 of the little clips on them and I only have two hands!
I put them in the naval jelly for a while and rinsed/blew them off,then rolled pieces of sandpaper for the holder part.
I found the Kopr-shield at an electric supply place but they wanted $55 for a 1/2 pint! I left it there.
I put all new fuses in and everything works! It's a wonderful thing and Paula is thrilled to have her ragtop back for summer cruising.I have to tell you,this was a miserable job.I like restoring old cars but you never think about stupid stuff like this taking up your time and energy when you feel you could be working on "real" restoration stuff.
 
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