Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just bought an 89 Camaro. I thought that I had taken all the appropriate precautions. Took it to a mechanic, etc. Well, 3 days after I bought the car, I changed the oil.It immediately started to knock. I went back to the person that I bought it from and he says "I just had the heads replaced, so there was nothing wrong with the car when you bought it.)He obviously assumed that because I am a woman, I would not realize that the car had to have gotten very hot to need the heads replaced.I would like some other opinions on what might have caused the knocking rod, and also what they might have used in the oil, to quiet the knocking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,047 Posts
Hello REDBIRD, I think you might have figured right. Sounds like maybe car did get hot, and that could smoke a rod bearing. I don't know what they could have used to keep it quite. Maybe it was just right on the ragged edge, and changing oil was all it took to start singing. I hope you can get it resolved.

------------------
Steve
67 SS 396,4-sp
67 RS 327,4-sp
72 RS 350/350
69 4X4 suburban 350,4-sp
73 3/4 ton 454/400
http://www.geocities.com/stevocamaro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Before we go all crazy, I've got a couple of questions. Oil change, to what viscosity/type of oil? Did you use a Fram filter? If so, change it to either an AC or Purolater filter before you do anything else.

Have heard of, and experienced personally, Fram filters making top end and lifter noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I am a little confused here! Getting hot does not mean a head needs replacing or a bearing will sieze. Did the seller mean that new head "gaskets" had been installed? That would make more sense unless the heads that had been replaced were a perfomance oriented replacement. As for the rod bearing, the most likely culprit would have been a lack of oil during operation, bad oil pressure (pump) or an overheated condition. The overheating itself wouldnt have necessarily caused the seizure but rather the following shutdown of the engine and then the restart after the oil coked. If you had your oil change done, how much oil was removed, what was the condition, did it appear to be excessively thick in comparison to the normal oil weight? Have you had the bearing looked at to see if it is scored or compressed (spun)? More information would be helpful as the info given so far isnt too complete. Let us know!

------------------
web page at <A HREF="http://hometown.aol.com/winterjl/index.html
and" TARGET=_blank>http://hometown.aol.com/winterjl/index.html
and</A> more pictures at http://photos.yahoo.com/supertrick1
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
Years ago when I was in college I bought a '64 Dodge van (yes - it had paneling, shag carpet, a tapestry handing from the ceiling and an 8-track tape deck). Anyway - it also burned about a quart of oil every 15 miles!!!

The seller had neglected to mention the completely worn out condition of the motor. There were also no laws addressing this so I was stuck. As a poor college kid I didn't have any money to do a rebuild so I managed to get it to run decent and not burn too much oil by running (believe it or not) 4-1/2 quarts of STP and a pint of regular oil! It actually ran very good and I drove it for a few months before trading it for an 11 second '66 Nova. In this case the guy I traded it to was a friend and I told him about the problem and the fix. He just traded it off to someone else who I'd guess didn't get the same info.

However, today there are fairly strong laws in place that require the seller to disclose any problems. I'd go back to the seller - with a lawyer if necessary - and ask him to either take the car back or pay for repairs. If all else fails you can probably sue in small claims court for reasonable repair costs.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
10,144 Posts
Save a sample of the old oil. It can be analyized to tell what had been done to it. That oil analyisis would support your claim that the owner knew there was a problem and missrepresented the condition of the engine.
If you belong to triple A they might help you with it. Check with your insurance agent for help. Many of them use experts for their claims proccessing.
Talk to the District Attourney's office for help. Maybe you can get them to lean on the seller and save you money.
I used to autocross an 85 and 89 Camaro, I heard of several cases where the engines developed rod knock. One of them threw a rod.
Usually the knock developed when hot and got worse. I would NOT run the thin weight oil specified on the oil filler cap for these engines. Especially when the engine has a lot of miles on it.
I'd go to a 10/40 over 40k miles, or 20/50 over 80k miles.
Good luck, David

------------------
The older I get, the faster I was!

[This message has been edited by davidpozzi (edited 05-05-2000).]
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top