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Discussion Starter #1
Here’s what I have:
68 Camaro
355 Motor
200R4 transmission


I got under the car a couple of weeks ago and found that the TV Cable housing was seeping. When I put the housing in it must have gotten sideways and scored the gasket. Anyway I believe I got that stopped. Knock on wood.
Now it seems that I have one more seeping part to attack. The Shift Shaft seal seems to be leaking. From my service manual it seems like this is a metal press in bushing. But as service manuals usually do the only way to service anything on the car it to fully disassemble it.

What I'm wondering now is:
Can the bushing be replaced without dropping the pan? I've had that pan off and on 8 times already and I just got satisfied with the fact it isn't my leak. I'm afraid to risk it.
If I replace the seal how far do you tap it in to seat it? Is there a groove in the transmission or something? I’m thinking the seal could also not be seated properly, maybe too far in or out. Service manual just say tap it in with a hammer and 13MM socket.
With this seeming like it’s a metal bushing is a leak in this area normal? If so have there been any upgraded parts for it?

Again thanks for your time.
 

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There is a special tool to pull the seal without pulling the pan. DON"T try to get the seal out any other way rather than completely dissambeling it. There is no bushing just the tranny case. I don't know if you can buy this tool at just a parts store, I got mine from Snap On $$$.

If you do pull the seal then be very careful when installing the new one. There are two shoulders on the shaft where the shift lever fits. You can start the new seal on the shaft but then you need to take a pocket screw driver and gently work the lip of the new seal over these places on the shaft. You can then use the 13MM socket to finish driving it in like the book said. There is a bottom that will stop it from going in to far.

Larry
www,lnjstreetrods.com
 

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You will have to remove the pan and may have to remove the valve body to pull the shaft out and get access to the seal. Many shifter shafts have a bolt on the detent cam that makes it unecessary to remove the valve body. I have always used a large screwdriver, stuck it in under the lip of the seal and pryed them out without trouble. Tap the new seal in flush and it doesn't hurt to lightly grease the exterior of the seal with rtv in case the seal bore is slightly scratched. Grease the shaft lightly with vasiline before installing. If any of the pan bolt holes are sucked up, tap them flat again with a ball-peen hammer. Inspect the pan gasket surface on the case for drain holes and be certain your gasket is cut away as necessary so the drain back holes aren't blocked. Use a good gasket (not cork) and loosely install all bolts. Do a final torque to spec in an alternating sequence. Usually the spec is in the neighborhood of 12 ft-lbs (same for valve body bolts if removed). Your pan gasket should not leak, but may weep a bit over time as they all tend to do.

-dnult

[This message has been edited by dnult (edited 08-09-2002).]
 

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Dnult,

You have a lot of good answers on this thread, but I am suprised that you don't have a shift shaft seal puller. With it there is no need to pull the pan.

I am not being smart in any way here, but with the puller this is a 30 minute or less job.

Larry
www.lnjstreetrods.com
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by lnjstreetrods:
Dnult,

I am not being smart in any way here, but with the puller this is a 30 minute or less job.

Larry
www.lnjstreetrods.com
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't rebuild or service transmissions for a living. In fact I did most of my transmission overhaul work between the ages of 18 and 25. I was able to do most of my work with a screwdriver, snap-ring pliers, sockets, feeler guages, home made spring compressor and alignment jigs. (Man I loved those 350s and 400s) My first overhaul cost a grand total of about $60. Things have changed a bit since then (such as 700-R4 jig requirements) but get by as cheap as possible. Now I do tranny work out of necessity or as favors. I guess that means I may sacrifice some time by not having the right tool for the job. On the other hand, the long way gives you a chance to look things over. I guess you could say I'm more intriqued by automatics than engines.

-dnult
 

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Dnult,

I do want to say how much I appreciate your attitude on things. I have always been as innovative as possible also. I have made many of my own tranny tools over the years.

Here is something for you to think about though. If you have done 350, and 400's don't let the 700 scare you. After you do one 700 you will never look back. There are really no super special tools required to do the 700. On any G.M. tranny one should use a band around the front pump to aline the two halves when tightening. The 700 because of the thickness of the pump seems more critical than the others. Here is the cure for no tools required on the pump. With the case still empty before assy of the tranny, take the rubber oring off the pump put it in the case up side down, tighten the bolts then remove the pump and proceed.

The only other thing to do on the 700 is buy a Trans Go Shift Kit, and read EVERY stitch of every page that Gil sends and you will go into this tranny with your eyes open.

Ain't Skeerd, Larry
www.lnjstreetrods.com
 
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