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Discussion Starter #1
I know this may be a dumb question to some of you guys but…

Can the new Camaro wheels with a bolt pattern of 5X120 fit on the first generation Camaro with a 5X120.7 pattern?

I know the stud size is different too but that should be an easy conversion.

I was just wondering if with a little bit of drilling they might be made to fit without hurting them cosmetically.

I wondering because I’m looking at buying “new” used tires & sometimes the guy wants to sell the tires with the rims.
 

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You can fit the bolt pattern with little problem. The real problem is that the backspace and height can't really be fixed which is why they won't fit. It would take billet spacers several inches thick that cost about as much as some wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well really I guess I used the wrong reference.

What I meant was ANY 5X120.7 wheel.

I know the 2010 Camaro wheels would have other issues besides the bolt pattern.

If I know that I can fit 5X120.7’s on a first generation, it just opens up a lot more options in the wheel & tire combo world.

Thanks
 

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I'm not going to go on record as making a recommendation either way, but many many people have used a 5 x 120mm rim on a GM 5 x 4-3/4 (120.65mm) hub. Some do nothing, some use hubcentric rings.
 

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I agree with Steiner, and am in full disclaimer mode as well. I don't have any direct experience with this and cannot recommend due to the lack of experience. But, I have seen a bunch of guys on pro-touring.com use 5x120mm on their Camaro's without an adapter. I think that's a BMW bolt pattern, and a cheap way to get into mesh style wheels. I also recall seeing some reasonably priced adapter plates out there if you want to adapt it to 5x4.75" (around $100-150 for a set of 4).

There was also some mention of lugnuts that self centered on the stud, so you didn't need the adapter. They are called wobble nuts or PCD variable nuts. The lugnut centers itself on a floating washer. Here's a pic to give an idea:



Again, I have no experience with them, and they could be off-shore junk for all I know.
 

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... mention of lugnuts that self centered on the stud, so you didn't need the adapter. They are called wobble nuts or PCD variable nuts. The lugnut centers itself on a floating washer. Here's a pic to give an idea:



Again, I have no experience with them, and they could be off-shore junk for all I know.
Hummmmm - non-Hub-Centric rims with 'Self' Centering lug nuts on different circle patterns ...
What could go wrong :p
 

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Hummmmm - non-Hub-Centric rims with 'Self' Centering lug nuts on different circle patterns ...
What could go wrong :p
Yeah, hence the multiple disclaimers!:beers:

Yet guys are running these wheels on sites where they drive their cars a lot harder than most do on here.
 

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There are also threads on pt about this being a bad idea. One user who is also an automotive engineer posted a some kind of stress analysis showing increased stress on the studs. I'd pass.
 
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