Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
764 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As I'm getting in deeper financially with my car I need to address security (Currently have none). Lots of good info on this site and I have made a plan. One of the areas of concern is denying, or at least make it difficult, to access the engine bay. Chains/Padlocks, hood pins, etc... not really what im looking for. I've found a thread where someone has rigged a manually operated cable that has a rod going through the hood latch (see second pic):

http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=166060

I'd like to do this but my idea is to have something like a solenoid with a rod that is connected to the alarm system. Activate the alarm, solenoid slides the rod through a hole in the latch - just like a deadbolt in a door. My question is: does such a thing exist? Any suggestions or thoughts are welcome!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,705 Posts
The 1st time someone stole something from my X's 1967 SS it was the huge air cleaner assembly - the second AND third time it was the battery, it was stolen twice within the month (typical trick - steal a battery, then go back a week or so later and steal the 'new' one :sad:) - then I changed it to a side terminal (to match the rest of GM vehicles) and installed a Hood Latch cable off of a 70's Chevy pickup to activate the stock latch.
Viola! no more stolen parts :noway:

Wasn't a hard fit - cut off the hood latch pull arm extension, drilled a hole in rad. support for bracket, routed cable to area under dash and drilled a hole in the remaining piece of the stock pull arm and used a small cable clamp (like from a choke or bicycle brake cable) to adjust the cable length to get the best action.

Worked great and didn't loose any more batteries or air cleaners ...

I have just a bracket with a hole and a hole drilled in the pull arm to put a lock in on my 68 now - I install the lock if I'm going to leave it sitting somewhere I don't want the hood opened.

I would be afraid the solenoid would fail or not operate at just the WRONG time ... but that's me.

Along with a coil-grounding switch - I am also know to pull the coil wire and stick it in my pocket at shows or cruises ;)
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
14,279 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
764 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
John, that's pretty close to what I had in mind. A little more $$ than what I anticipated (for the electric one) and may require more fabrication - to mount in the fender well - thats above my skill level. Now if I can just find a similar device that's just one unit without the rocker switches and other extras I'd be good to go.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
14,279 Posts
John, that's pretty close to what I had in mind. A little more $$ than what I anticipated (for the electric one) and may require more fabrication - to mount in the fender well - thats above my skill level. Now if I can just find a similar device that's just one unit without the rocker switches and other extras I'd be good to go.
Very simple install. Drill 2 holes in the hood recess through to the inner fender. the a simple strap brace from the back of of the unit. Drill a hole where the lock pin meets the hood.

Since you are using it for security. (I used 2 as the hood latches) you only need 1.

These guys will probably sell you a single if you call.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
653 Posts
I guess the OP means a solenoid to unlock the hood?
Using one to lock would draw current all the time, bad.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
764 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I guess the OP means a solenoid to unlock the hood?
Using one to lock would draw current all the time, bad.
My bad for saying solenoid. I'm still working my way through my Haynes Automotive Electrical Techbook. I think I'm looking for an actuator.

On cars with electric door locks: you push a button on your alarm remote, it locks the door and arms the system. There is no constant power to that door lock mechanism. That is all I want for the hood - push a button on the remote, hood locks and the system is armed. Push the button again, doors (and hood) unlock, system disarms.

Maybe that's what I can do; get an electric door locking mechanism and rig it to slide a rod through a hole in the latch, just like the manual one in the link I posted above... Something like this;

http://www.parts-express.com/pe/sho...edium=cpc&utm_campaign=pla&utm_term={keyword}
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,349 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
14,279 Posts
I guess the OP means a solenoid to unlock the hood?
Using one to lock would draw current all the time, bad.
The system I posted uses power to open and close the pin. It does not use power to hold.

It's a momentary switch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,513 Posts
What happened to the old chapman lock systems, it was just a pushbutton key with a circular security key that mounted above the parking brake on the dash, and an armored cable went to the hood latch. When it was locked (just push in the keyswitch) it drove a locking pin into the hood release that prevented it from opening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,267 Posts
Actuators could be used but be aware they may want to spring back after hitting full travel in or out after being powered up.

I hooked up a basic actuator like what you linked to with nothing attached to the plunger end and with it starting out with the plunger fully retracted I applied 12 volts to one wire and ground to the other for just a split second like it would be when hooked up to an alarm and the plunger popped fully out but when it hit full travel out it had enough momentum to bounce and go back in some to where it was no longer at full extended travel. I then reversed the power and ground again for a split second and the plunger retracted but then bounced back out a little bit.
When this actuator is fully installed in a car and hooked to the lock mechanism normally it has enough drag on it to prevent this bounce but if a very simple end is attached to the plunger to throw a pin through a hole there may not be enough drag. What you could do is possibly add an O ring or two under the accordian rubber cover to make it harder for the actuators plunger to extend and retract but not so much as to put too much load on the actuators motor and gear assembly.


As far as the old Chapman locks, this style of mechanical hood locks are still out there but getting harder to find and be of a long enough length for the older cars. If you do get one of these, replace the cheap imported relay on it with a good Bosch brand relay. I had one that the relay failed pretty quickly.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,905 Posts
If you are going to use a solenoid that runs off the battery, have a plan for when the battery dies and you need to get into the engine bay.

One method would be to have a parallel plug off the soleniod that you can get to and plug into an accessory 12V source. The plug is just tucked up under the front valence and tied off for when you need it. Or a direct plug behind the front grill but you better have some means of popping the hood when the battery dies or you are really going to have a bad day.

alan
 

·
Admin/Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,511 Posts
Once upon a time every dealership had these cable ignition/hood lock sets at the service counter until the 70's when cable release became standard. They were called a Chapman Lock. The lock also disabled the ignition at the coil and used a barrel lock set to secure the lock. They changed their name a while back to be more marketable http://zlokhoodlock.com/

Also under this name: Amazon.com: Megatronix - HL6 - 6 Foot Mechanical Hood Lock Cable With Ignition Interrupt: Automotive

I like mine and it gets the job done without major changes to your vehicles stock look and feel.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top