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Discussion Starter #1
I have made a decision to do some technical videos and explain some of the ways we do things. The start of this is today.

One question we get all the time is how do I measure for pushrods. We field about 4 of these a week from customers and others just needing some direction. I feel this is an area that the DIY guy is not comfortable with during engine building.

So I hired a videographer and last week we shot a video on how to establish proper rocker geometry so that one can find correct pushrod length. This is our way, Straub Technologies and my staff, to give friends, customers, and performance crowd something that they can use as an educational tool. The method Scott Foxwell uses in the video is the way that it is done here.



If the board wants to make the link to the video a sticky that is fine
 

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Just watched this over on Team Chevelle. Excellent video, Chris! Thank you
 

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The video is not working for me...It says "This video has been removed by the user"..
 

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Great video. Can you use this method with a hydraulic lifter or is it more accurate to use a solid lifter?
 

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Would you do what is shown in the video but unscrew the rocker adjuster nut the necessary amount of turns (preload inches required divided by number of inches of adjuster nut per turn) to account for recommended lifter preload? Wouldn't the pushrod be short by the amount of needed lifter preload if this method is followed exactly?
 

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I don't see how to use this method with stock rocker arms unless someone has an idea how to find the centerline through the rocker. :(
 

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The centerline through a stock rocker runs from the center of the pivot (if the pivot ball was a sphere) to the face of the rocker where it contacts the valve tip. You would need to determine the true radius of the sphere that is formed by the ball seat, and then mark the center of the sphere on the outside of the rocker. There may be other ways to do it, but I think you could purchase a ball bearing that is the same diameter of a stock rocker pivot ball (mcmaster has them), and then use a caliper to scribe the centerline of that ball on the outside of a rocker (working off the bottom of the ball as your datum, through the stud hole in the rocker arm). The hardest part is figuring out the diameter/radius of the rocker pivot seat.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Next video will be Cam Degree Install using Duration Method. It will be later this fall.

With the positive response and suggestions we are going to ASSUME, in future videos, the view knows nothing and go over stuff. I feel stuff like this helps the DIY guy and keeps our industry healthy.
 

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That was pretty awesome Chris. It appeared you were using light weight springs for the measurements unless I missed something. Might want to make that clear that it is easier to do it that way other than full on springs. It's late hope I didn't miss it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Would you do what is shown in the video but unscrew the rocker adjuster nut the necessary amount of turns (preload inches required divided by number of inches of adjuster nut per turn) to account for recommended lifter preload? Wouldn't the pushrod be short by the amount of needed lifter preload if this method is followed exactly?
With a hyd roller you want to add .050" to the length for the preload.
 
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