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Discussion Starter #1
Okay guys, I am not sure if anyone has posted about this before but I want to contribute in my wn little way here at Team Camaro so I thought that I would start a spot weld comparo thread... Please chime in with your likes and dislikes!

So, as far as I know, there are only two types of spot weld removers (other than an air chisel) that are available.

A cutter style on the top and a drill bit style on the bottom :


In my experience both of them get the job done, however,if the metal that you are trying to separate doesn't pop apart, you will inevitably cut into the metal that you want to remain on the vehicle..

Here is a pic of what they both look like if you run it into the base metal (the drill bit is on the left, the cutter style is on the right):


Here are the pros to each of them in my opinion:

Cutters leave more metal behind so there is less to repair.

Drill bit style last a lot longer

Here are the cons:

Cutters tend to walk more (even with a pilot punch mark or small drilled pilot hole)
Cutters do not last as long and break easily as it seems the guide point dulls.
One the "reversible" cutting head seizes on the arbor, you are never gonna get it off...talk about frustrating..

Spot well drill bits have a small guide point on them that can quickly wear away causinig the bit to become useless, unless you start drilling with a good bit, then switch to a bit with a worn guide point.
These also seem to be more labor intensive: punch a start mark, drill a pilot hole so you don't wear the guide point down, then start with a good bit, then once the hole is started switch to a worn bit so you can preserve the good bit, then repeat.

So here are some side by side picks of good bits/cutters and bad bits/cutters:
Cutters:


Bits:



So take it for what it's worth, but which ever you decide that you like better, but they both work for me and they both have there quirks...

I hope this helps people that ask which is better to use!
 

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I can tell you that after removing both full rear quarters, the trunk weatherstripping gutters, and the driver's side seat track frame that the cutter worked quicker and easier than that drill bit type. Here are the keys to success that I found though:

With the cutter, you must pre-drill a 1/8" pilot hole so it won't walk on you.

Also, if you keep the cutter cool, and lubed as you use it, you will be able to get double the life out of it before throwing it away. I used a scratch awl and a slight tap of the hammer to remove any discs of steel that got stuck in the cutter. It was quick and painless every time. I am only on my second cutter so far and I have cut out at least 100 spot welds I would say just on this project. I bought the cheapies at Harbor Freight Tools for $2.99 each. THEY ARE ON SALE NOW if you receive their catalogs in the mail every other day like I do. They sure are aggressive with their marketing aren't they? LOL! (My $.02);)
 

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I can tell you from my experience that I had spent close to $100 for 5 of the end mil drills.

1) The ones that I bought have a flat spot on the shank and if you have a three point chuck then the drill ens up off center. It's a pain in the A**. Also I can not find a company that can sharpen them. The company I work for uses hundreds of drills each day and the vendor that supplies them can't do it either.

2) I prefer the cutter type. You actually get 6 cutters...3 per package both sides usable at a cost of $16. Just remember to adjust the point
tension so it will not wear down so quick.

If you are not saving the panel behind the one you are drilling out then I would use a regular dill bit. I like the ability to run it through my drill doctor from time to time.

In the end I pretty must use anything to get the panels apart.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, I don't like to, but if I have to I use the Air chisel... It helps in places you just can't get a drill in and sometimes it ends up better than if you had drilled it out! I sharpen my chisel on the bench grinder before I use it, that seems to help...
 

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I use the rota- broach type and Ilike them. I got mine from the Matco truck. Only complaint is they are hard to keep going straight sometimes.
 

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My first cutter was from Eastwood. I believe it was $24.00 I also got a pack of extra cutters (3) in the pack at an additional cost. I ate thru them real quick. Maybe 30 spots removed. The teeth continued to break. I then picked up 2 from Harbor Freight. $4.99 each. its much stronger and cheaper in price. Mentioned above, ya gotta drill a pilot hole. No problem removing the saw here. Ajustable wrench and a pair of channel locks. takes them off every time.
 

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I still use the cutter type 99% of the time, when I am trying to save the metal to put back together. If I am discarding the top panel, I just cut it back with whatever I have available, and then grind what spotweld is left. I think it sure saves on the amount of work required on the saved piece.

I find that the reason the spot-weld cutters dull or fail so quickly usually happens when I am trying to use them too quickly/aggressively. If you take your time and don't put a bunch of pressure on them, they will last 4-5 times longer.

When I put the floorpans in my car, I drilled EVERY spotweld out. This caused me tons more work than I really needed. If I were doing it again, I would just cut the pan out, staying away from the welds around the perimeter. I would then grind it loose from the frame rails, the rockers, and the front toe boards and rear pans. Now I would use a spot-weld tool to take the seat brackets from the rockers, being extremely carefull to not drill all the way thru. Then, when you reinstall them, you have a perfect template of where they go. If you grind the pan loose from the rockers, rear pan, and toe-boards, then you have minimal prep work prior to installing the new pan....

Sorry such a lengthy reply, but that's my $.02
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Also, if you keep the cutter cool, and lubed as you use it, you will be able to get double the life out of it before throwing it away.

What do you lube it with?
 

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I also discovered that the cutter last WAY longer if you lube them and use a fairly low speed. You can get cutting lubricant at most hardware stores (possibly near were they sell the taps and dies). I recommend using lubricant with almost any metal cutting/drilling operation.
 

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Another vote for the cutter, keeping it lubed, and keeping the rpm's down.

I used a lube designed for thread-cutting that I found at Home Depot in the plumbing aisle.

I also use my cordless screwdriver instead of an electric drill - the lower speed keeps from overheating the cutter and also helps prevent breaking the teeth off.

I went through about three cutters removing the seat risers, subframe mounts, and floors on both sides.
 

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I like to use the 1/4" wide grinding wheels, the same size as the cutoff wheels. Since they are 1/4" wide they last longer. I just grind the spot weld down then seperate it with a putty knife or gasket scraper. That way the metal behind it is still there and no drill bit hole to fill up.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am beginning to wish that I had used/knew about the grinding method. It is taking me a LONG time to repair the rings that were left behind from the cutter.

Meh, It is keeping me off the streets though! (And I am sure that my compressor running all night long is making my neighbors love me even more!)
 

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I was wondering if anybody has used or has an opinion on the different spot weld drills. I never see them mentioned much related to spot weld removal discussions and didn't know if they were worth the additional investment. Not many reviews on the Internet. Thanks!
:confused:

Astro Pneumatic
http://files.pbepro.com/Astro Pneumatic Tool Company/images/hi/1756.jpg

HTP Spot Mill
http://www.htpweld.com/products/auto_body_tools/index.htm#HTP Spot Mill

Dent Fix Equipment DFXDF15DX - Spot Weld Annihilator
http://www.dentfix.com/viewitem.asp...Weld+Drill+Kit+-+UHSS,+BORON+and+AHSS+Capable
 
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