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Discussion Starter #1
My 68 has a 454 in it and based on everything i've found so far, it looks like it was a BB swap with all SB stuff so i'm assuming the coil springs are still the SB version. Is there any way to tell?
I want to go with tubular control arms and most say 1.5" to 2" drop, which I can not afford to go any lower. So my thought is that I go with the 1.5" drop arms and then install BB coil springs to get my ride height where I want it.
Thoughts?
 

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There is a difference in wire diameter and the free height (no weight on spring) between the SBC spring and the BBC spring. The increased wire diameter changes the spring rate to account for the heavier engine. Springs are selected by the factory based upon the car's weight which is based upon options installed above the base car. All cars had the same ride height at the time they left the factory.

That said all springs sag with age. So your current ride height must first be compared to the factory ride height before you can make any determination as to adding or subtracting from the factory ride height (replacement parts add or subtract from the factory ride height, not what you have now).

How you choose to drive also affects spring choice. Drag racers want a small gauge wire with a very tall free height to store a lot of energy that is used for weight transfer upon a launch, but settles down low to improve aerodynamics. Road racers want a stiff spring rate to plant the tires and help prevent body roll (which is actually not the responsibility of the springs, but an anti-roll bar; the springs on one side help control roll by adding their spring rate to the bar as it twists). Finally on the street you want a smooth ride without vibrating your teeth out. all depend upon spring and shock choice as well as roll bar size.

If you are changing the a-arms any way I advise choosing coil over shocks that way you can change your springs in a matter of minutes (as easy as changing a shock). You can have a set of different springs standing by to autocross, drag, or cruise.

Big Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Is there an economical way to go to coil overs without spending a fortune on the ridetech/Hotchkis stuff?
 

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If you are changing the a-arms any way I advise choosing coil over shocks that way you can change your springs in a matter of minutes (as easy as changing a shock).
Big Dave, I usually agree with you 99% but I have Global West A arms and QA1 coil overs. If I wanted to change a spring I would have to drop the lower ball joint. Not as easy as changing a shock. That said I can adjust the ride height with their special wrench which probably change the spring rate a bit.
 

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Check out Viking. After the New Years I might order a set of Viking coilovers for the front of my 69 and go with a tubular control arms or at least upper arms with different geometry.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Check out Viking. After the New Years I might order a set of Viking coilovers for the front of my 69 and go with a tubular control arms or at least upper arms with different geometry.
Thanks, I like the looks of those. I also looked at the Alden but the Alden don't look to have the same amount of ride height adjustability as the Viking do.
 

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1st I don’t recommend tubular and coil overs with stock subframes. The correct coil, shock and poly or delrin bushings work very well.

The ride height adjustment is within an small range. You’re not going to simply raise and lower 3”- 4”.

Final ride height, ride comfort and handling is based on a combination of shock length and travel, springs and shock dampening and rebound. All must be considered when choosing a coil over
 

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If you go to coilover shocks, get lower A arms that are made for coilovers. The stock spring bucket can restrict access to the shock mounting and adjusters depending on brand of shock. If the adjusters are on the lower body of the shock, the spring bucket type A arms are a terrible choice. Ride Tech and Global West make coilover specific A arms. I don't like the QA1 style of spring. The upper end mounts in the stock spring seat, the lower is on the shock. It's very easy for the coil to put side loading on the shock and destroy the seal.



I like the Ride Tech coilover shocks, they have a lifetime guarantee. A shock that uses std common circle track/roadrace coils is easy to find other rate coils for.
 
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