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I struggled with my Camaro starting slow when hot for a couple summers. Then i was pulling the starter to replace the rear main seal and discovered the plastic nose of the solenoid had a crack across it. Changed the solenoid, no problems since.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thanks. If I get through all the tests and get to that point, I’ll pull it off and inspect / test it. Btw, my rear seal is starting to drip.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Today I decided to start by setting the timing. Because this car has AC and PS getting a good view of the timing tab is a PITA. First a loosened the distributor and while doing that I of course moved it so not exactly sure where it was. However, I set it to 4° BTDC as that’s where it’s supposed to be. After doing this I took it out for a ride and i can’t believe how much better it runs. Like a different car. So that tells me it wasn’t right. After driving it a few miles and having the car running 15min or so while I was setting the idle and timing, it fired right up after shutting it off. Now granted, it’s 70° right now not 97°. I plan on running it around this afternoon to get it good and hot to see if it still has the issue. I’ll report back.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Just took the car out for a ride. I knew something was different as soon as I cranked it over cold as it immediately fired right up. After driving it in 95° for a while, I shut it off and it fired right back up.

I seriously didn’t think it was a timing issue. Can someone explain why this was happening??

Thanks so much for the help!!!!!

Ed
 

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Timing can do that. Depends o your motor. 4* btdc is not much but I don't recall what you have. I am at 14* and as long as the battery is charged no problem. Stock timing specs were not necessarily for performance.
 

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You may gain performance and milage by advancing the timing to 8 to 10 degrees, but without finding true TDC and using a degree wheel, I would recommend no more than 12 degrees. With ethanol, you could experience hot start problems with the new timing and also detonation.
The problem is GM used many advance curves in the stock distributors. I have found stock mechanical advance setups with 40 degrees that required a 2 degree ADC initial timing and also mechanical advance setups with only 17 degrees and 6 degrees BTC in the 70s smog cars. Some guys that set their total mechanical advance to 36 or 38 degrees with a 18 degree distributor are running 18 degrees initial advance and have your hot start problems.
If you are going to stray too far from the factory specs, I would recommend you do some research to determine what you have and what you can do. There are a couple of gurus on here that can help.

Ron
 

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Al - Waterloo, Iowa
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You're experiencing kick back. The act of firing the cylinder early tries to push the piston back down the cylinder before getting to top dead center fighting with the starter. A good starter, battery, etc. can easily handle 10* btc timing. Nothing wrong with running 4* but you might be leaving some power on the table and mpg. My guess is you have a slightly tired starter. Especially if your still running the 10MT starter.
 

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Mike
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Now that you have the distributor's initial timing set to 4° BTDC, have you checked to see how much total mechanical advance you are getting? To check, you would disconnect the vacuum advance hose and plug vacuum line... and then rev your engine until there was no additional gain in advance. You would need to have some kind of degree indicators on your harmonic balancer to check.

Does your distributor have vacuum advance (VA)?... and if so, where is the VA connected (full time manifold or posted/timed vacuum)?
If the VA is connected to a ported/timed vacuum source, you could pick up some additional advance on your initial timing by switching the VA over to a full time vacuum source. This would not effect the initial timing when starting the engine since the additional VA would not come into play until the engine is running, but the additional advance could boost your engine's performance.
  • Note: If you decide to connect the VA to a full time vacuum source, you should first check to see how much advance the VA is providing AND is the VA at full pull (fully advanced) at idle vacuum. If the VA is providing too much advance, there are ways to limit the amount. It's all part of "fine tuning" your advance curve if you want to take this a step further.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Sorry for the late response. When I set the timing to 4°, that was with the VA removed And the hose plugged. The VA is connected to the bottom of the carburetor.

Ed
 

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There is nothing wrong with the ever start Maxx batteries. I use them all the time. I have one in my Z as well as my lawnmower. I personally would run a ground from the engine block to the subframe. Mine comes from the fuel pump area to the frame. I also am running the four copper factory flat ground wires. Maybe get your battery load tested, and have the starter tested off the car. Most auto parts stores will do that for free.
 

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Ground straps have nothing to do with the starter. The OP needs to concentrate on the big starter cables and the current path. Nothing else.
 

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seems you fixed it, but if others have this problem 2 of my chevys did this a 454 silverado and a 350 camaro both I remedied by putting aluminum foil (and then later a legit heat shield) between the solenoid and heat manifold.
 

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Cheapest place to start is [when the engine is hot]: pull plugs / see how engine turns over by hand. If you like that... then you're probably looking at a new starter motor. Amperage problems generally do not create an underspeed: it's either going to go, or maybe drop out mid crank. Motor speed is a function of number of poles, and if varnish is breaking down under heat [shorting winding to winding], that effectively changes things like the motor was wound differently. I am assuming your system voltage does not drop under 9 volts [or thereabouts] when cranking.
 
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