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Re: subframe and suspension busings

I'm not sure that there is much difference.... I used polygraphite though.
 

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They are the same as far as performance. Polygraphite is just polyurethane impregnated with graphite to help reduce squeaks by being self lubricating. The front suspension parts still need the silicone based goo that come with them. The Energy Suspension polyurethane parts with numbers that end in "G" are graphite impregnated.
 

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Use the stock ones. The performance gains are minimal and you will not have to worry about lubricating them and squeaking.
 

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Like mentioned above, it all depends on what you want. I have aluminum subframe bushings, poly bushings all around, a lowered stance, and low profile 17" tires. I want my car to feel like a late ± sporty model. For road confort, I have a US made barge; brand withheld for logic reasons.:D
 

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As said my car is Pro-Street and I veared away from aluminum energy are pretty stiff me personaly would stay away from metal to metal.Is your suspension stock and still a leaf spring car....

LOL, I guess aluminum subframe bushings are too brutal for pro-street guys; that's why only the pro-touring guys are running them. :D
 

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At least you did the LOL thing.I think a little flex is good....JMO
Seriously, no modern chassis engineer designs in flex. To the contrary, the stiffest possible chassis is the goal. A stiff chassis allows the suspension to perform without rogue inputs. That's why us pro-touring guys are all over solid subframe bushings and subframe connectors.
 

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Street for street, track for track...
The modern rubbers are far supeior in tecnologhy than 40 yrs ago
There are 100% fine for strret /track where one can cruise in comfort as the car was intended to do, drive to the track a few times a yr (strip or circuit) have some fun and drive home
More serious track work ureathane...if you dont mind more vibrations for the next few yrs on the road
Metal to metal for real serious track and more suited for the dedicated track car

When one is running a 'hobbist' street /track one is not looking for that extra 01 sec down in the 9s and 10s....and that extra .1 is better picked up in tuning , ratios and stuff.

For a 40 yr old car with std suspension , even compared to similar modern cars, Im my 69 still out cnrs most, goes around like a go kart....

Use the equipment that you want to use the car for...not what your ego says...and that not only applies to suspension.
 

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Use the equipment that you want to use the car for...not what your ego says...and that not only applies to suspension.
I agree with this. If you want to use the car as a monument to 40 year old suspension technology - use rubber; if you want to take advantage of modern materials, manufacturing and knowledge, use the parts the aftermarket has developed and brought to us. Solid subframe or control arm bushings don't mean the car has to ride like a tank, they merely mean that you can set the suspension up more precisely for whatever use you want by eliminating non-intended imputs from unpredictable flex in the chassis and the suspension.
 

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Thats what I was thinking...

Most people will not even notice the difference between rubber or poly, as far as vibrations and the like. (I feel the same with solid, but haven't tried them personally)
Remember the suspension bushings are pivot points.

I put in solid subframe bushings and connectors and the only difference was a more solid feeling ride. No extra noise or vibrations.
 
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