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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anybody know what the factory resistance level is for the temperature sending unit that sits in the side of the block? Just did the gauge conversion and the sending unit I have will peg the gauge in one direction or the other. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 

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Couple things to test.
Make sure the new sender is the right gauge sender and not an idiot light switch which only has two positions on or off.

Could also be a ground issue if its pegged. You didn't use Teflon tape or pipe dope on the threads of the new sender as it will prevent the ground.

Also what brand console gauges did you buy? Classic HQ units need the original style resistor across the rear of the gauge, while OER versions do not as they are internal resistor gauges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I bought the OER version. I don't mind adding in a resistor or something if I need to but I'd rather just try to figure out which is the proper sending unit.
 

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220F = 101 ohms

210F = 104 ohms

200F = 118 ohms

190F = 133 ohms

180F = 152 ohms

170F = 172 ohms

160F = 194 ohms

150F = 225 ohms
 

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The body of the sending unit should have zero ohms the the cylinder head/block and as Brian suggests, teflon tape will insulate the interface.
The stud to ground will have over 5K ohms to ground when cold.
As coolant heats up, the stud resistance in reference to ground, will decrease, typically to 150-200 ohms and move the needle to the right of the scale.
 

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teflon tape will insulate the interface.
yes only when misued....NEVER if applied correctly....a couple layer wound around tight in the correct direction...as the threads cut in and thru the tapes it forces the taple between the gaps in the treads sealing.
But ppl insist on thinking "more the better" wack of a heap of layers and often in the wrong direction, and sice the threads are only brass they 'bend' under the pressures dont contact and insulate...
Good new brass on brass threads should seal themselves anyway..if not over torqued and stretch the threads,,,that is why they are made of brass in the 1st place.

Its those small tricks of the trade, understanding ones tool that make a big difference, and not understanding creates myths.

Yes I do have teflon tape on 1 of my temp sensors..in the head... the sensor by the goose neck has teflon in the adapter to valley cover because I know that thread had at some time been over torqued with a bung...the thread between the adapter and sensor doesnt have any sealant... because Im the only one who has used those threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
And thanks for the help with the tape...

btw, holy cow you guys have a ton of posts! 23k?? 10k?? wow
 

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holy cow you guys have a ton of posts! 23k?? 10k?? wow
Jeeze ..never really noticed ..dont look at that sort of stuff...and most of us with high posts have been here for many yrs...
On the other hand
But if you guys didnt have so many problems and post......lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Good point... I'll just keep breaking crap to give you guys something to talk about!
 

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Oh and when winding tape on , think about it......
when u screw the thread in, the tape is in such a direction that it 'pulls' tighter
Not in a direction that it would tend to roll back over its self.
Direction depends on if right had and left hand threads....Im doing both that is how I check in my head just before winding on.
And on a similar line start at the bottom of the thread, so the tape catches as u start scewing in, but not enough over lap so a end bit can tear off and go into the system.

Yep even thread tape has a correct and incorrect method of use.

Or better still use the plumbers locktite thread sealler that we use on head and valley cover bolts.
2 to 3 layers max, a stretched well.
 
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