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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all.

I'm beginning a new project, just a plain jane 67 coupe.
It's a pretty bare rolling shell at the moment, and i've decided to tackle wiring first... To get everything working that should be; lights, ect.

Before I really go at it, I'd like to see what i'm working with. I have a new engine harness, i'm figuring I can plug it in and get a battery on it to see what I have that actually works.

So get the starter wire to the battery, ground the negative terminal and make sure any hot ends are covered to avoid shorts? Would I be missing any necessary grounds? First complete re-wire so i'm a little lost.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Welcome, Ang,
Each corner light assembly has a ground wire - use a star washer for digging into paint.
Same for ground battery cable.
From battery + post to battery junction block to horn relay buss bar to firewall into dash ans splits to headlamp switch and to ignition switch and to fuse panel for those BATT accessories.
Through the accessory to ground/body back to battery.
You may need to strap body to engine block, if installed, and pass fender with ground pigtail of negative battery cable.
 

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as Everett said clean all the grounds and possibly create new ones
it may be a bit over kill, but I created a junction box for the ground wires.
I have a piece of wire from the negative terminal to a junction where I have a wire from the body, the frame, starter and engine block
 

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I'll add that before you make the final connection to the battery (either the positive or ground cable) is put in a test light between the battery post and the cable end. If it lights up, then there is a draw or a short. If it's off, then there is no draw and then probably safe to finalize the battery post connection.
Sometimes when the car is fully wired up, the test light may come on dim with the test light test but this can be due to a memory circuit like from an aftermarket radio or alarm system.

Jim
 

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You would be better to just test for continuity of each wire with a digital OHM meter instead of hooking up and possibly frying a harness with a short.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the replies.

I ended up finding a whole lot more trouble than I expected once I really got down in there, it's quite the hack job, so I decided I definitely didn't want to put power to it.

Since it is far more incomplete than I had expected, I moved to an old donor car to check out its situation. It is a 67 Firebird, despite being rusted out and wrecked, the wiring throughout was overall in good shape. I pulled it all, front to back, and am just going to go with it. And since it's all out i'll easily be able to go over it and check for breaks ect which is nice.
 

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I'll add that before you make the final connection to the battery (either the positive or ground cable) is put in a test light between the battery post and the cable end. If it lights up, then there is a draw or a short. If it's off, then there is no draw and then probably safe to finalize the battery post connection.
Sometimes when the car is fully wired up, the test light may come on dim with the test light test but this can be due to a memory circuit like from an aftermarket radio or alarm system.

Jim
Excellent advice - particularly if you're working with a partially completed electrical system that can have a short in it. A light bulb has a self-regulating feature that comes in handy for things like this.
 
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