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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First off I want to say thanks to Jim.. The pictures you sent me helped out alot. Here are pictures of how I did it using my original circuit board. Thanks again jim!

--First picture is Jims Standard circuit board.
--Second picture is the standard board I modified.
--Third picture is the modified board with the Tic Toc Tach.
Green goes to coil.
Brown is full time Hot for the clock.
Yellow is switched power for tach.
White is ground.
--Forth picture shows the 4 pin connector used to connect the tach to the harness.
--Fifth is complete
 

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:thumbsup: Looks perfect! Nice use of the trailer connector, I never would have thought of that.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Nice. I've gotten into the habit of dropping my steering column when removing the Drivers Dash Bezel as I always scratch the top of the steering column if I don't and faced with a sanding a paint job.

Yea it was like that when I got it. I did drop the column when I removed the bezel.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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cool attaboy :thumbsup:
 

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Thanks for the great pictures and info. I'm getting ready to do this same procedure on my Camaro. I was going to buy the circuit board from Classic Industries. What exactly did you do to modify the original & how did you wire in the furl gauge in the console?
Thanks.
 

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Marc did his using the trailer connector to bring the extra signals into the dash cluster.
I rerouted some original wires when I did mine, mainly the yellow wire.

Switched power (IGN) is allready there, used to power up the fuel gauge and the idiot lights, I just re-arranged the run in the PCB to get it to the right place on the tach.

I cut the yellow wire (fuel sender) a few inches up the dash harness, and extended it and routed it to the guage in the console.

Then I took the "stub" of the cut off yellow wire coming from the dash connector, and extended it to reach BAT power (that's the missing signal, bat power for the clock) then modified the pcb to bring that signal to the correct pin on the tictoc tach.

Note that modifying the pcb ain't easy, you need to be good at soldering, and careful to apply just enough heat to get a strong connection, too much will melt the pcb.
 

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That's an interesting idea. I'll consider both. I received my tach yesterday & the clock was not attched. The wires are connected, but the unit itsself was not attached to the tach portion. Is this normal, if so, what keeps the clock in place when you pull onthe knob to adjust the time? Another question how do you determine where to drill the hole for the clock adjusting shaft throught the gauge lens? Sorry for the many questions, I just want to get this right the first time!

Thanks
 

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Assuming this is an OER brand gauge, it's broken, call your vendor. The clock should be firmly attached to the resr of the instrument.

As for the hole, I took the knob off, put a dab of black paint on the end, then lowered it as "lined up" as I could hold it toward the upside down gauge carrier, until the shaft touched the lens.

Then I drilled out the mark it left. Got lucky, hit the bullseye first try!
 
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