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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got some really nice #8 AWG wire that I want to use to connect the PWM fan controller to the Stinger battery terminals. The wire has 1650 strands and my question is whether to tin it, then crush it in the terminal or should I try to put some kind of copper jacket on it and crimp that before putting it into the terminal and clamping it down? Or should I get some wire that has fewer strands?

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68 SS/RS, 460 BB 4 speed, 3.73 Posi, new paint, motor mods , trans and diff assembly. 2" Drop
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When I did mine, I went with galvanized copper marine wire. Lot of strands and well coated, its also flexible like welding cable.
 

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Tinning is not recommended for that application because it will make a brittle joint that can fail.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One of the things I didn’t mention is that I haven’t (yet) found a thin, but crimp-able sleeve that will fit around the #8 AWG and fit inside the spare terminal. That’s why I thought going to a battery-spec wire with far fewer strands might be the solution… just shove the wire in the bore and clamp it down. I’m gonna see if I can come up with a thinner crimp sleeve bc I think that would make a better long-term solution for those thin strands.
 

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For whatever its worth I used a junction panel for my LS conversion that I made, its placed inside my fenderwell by the battery tray to house fan relays a couple of power junction points(ecm) plus the factory harness pos+ wiring from the horn relay. That panel is fed from the side terminal on my 34/78 battery to keep things neat and tidy not cluttering the battery area.
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My neighbour lent me his hydraulic crimping tool so that I could customize the length of my battery cables, it came with various gauge crimp bits- 2/0 awg to 10awg.

I bought Deka cables(USA made) in longer than needed length from Rock Auto and brushed light dab of dielectric grease on the connections before and aft. I went a little overboard with the protective sheathing but I guess its better than not enough around the header heat.
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These are just suggestions but in the end its your car and your call.
 

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I've used the terminals and fuse holders that have the allen head set screws in them and I DO not like them and then take into the variable that one manufacturer;s 8 gauge will have a different outside dimension than another and things get all screwed up.

When you put the stripped wire end into the hole and then tighten down the allen screw, you have a twisting screw pushing harder and harder against a stationary wire which if the strands are fine enough, chances are they will have a few torn apart. Not all, but a few.

When the allen screw is run into the same hole as the wire, if the wire does not fit tightly into the hole, more of the allen screw has to be threaded in to displace the area difference and now more damage to the wire strands can happen..

While I have not seen very many adaptor sleeves for use on those battery terminals, I have seen thicker ones on some car audio fuse holders but what these are for is the fuse holder can accept an 8 gauge wire or a 4 gauge wire and if a 4 gauge is used, then this sleeve is not used.

These are the adaptor sleeves I've seen before and in the below picture they call them a "casing".



I have seen on some terminal blocks that have set screws on them there is a tab under the screw to where no the allen screw pushes against this tab and then the tab spreading out the force, compresses against the wire and the cavity the wire is in.

What I have seen is sorta like below and you can see that the set screw does not make contact with the wire strands so no damage to the strands occurs from the twisting screw.

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Depending too on how thick an adaptor sleeve is, there may be enough thickness around the hole on the battery terminal to allow one to drill the hole out to a larger size.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I wound up ordering some low strand count copper wire my buddy recommended. This should do the trick.

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The problem with fine strand wire or even the second wire you chose, is that one of the strands will get caught up in the threads of the mechanical lug. The threads will become galled when this happens. You will think the screw is tight against the wire but it will be loose. Tugging on the wire after tightening the screw not a good test. You might not be strong enough to pull the wire out of the hole. A loose connection will get hot and the insulation will burn away from the mechanical lug.

You can buy a ferrule lug. I think this is what you are referring to as a sleeve. Stick the wire in the ferrule. Crimp the ferrule. Then stick the ferrule in the mechanical lug.

Here is an example of a ferrule lug kit with a crimper:

Rokrou Ferrule Crimping Tool Kit HCS8 6-6A Wire Ferrule Crimper Tool AWG 23-10 Hexagonal Crimper With 1900PCS Wire Connectors Kit Seven Types 0.25-6mm² - - Amazon.com


Believe it or not, using a mechanical lug and a fine strand wire is one of the hardest connections to make right. It is so difficult, that UL does not allow this type of connection to be made in an industrial environment.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The problem with fine strand wire or even the second wire you chose, is that one of the strands will get caught up in the threads of the mechanical lug. The threads will become galled when this happens. You will think the screw is tight against the wire but it will be loose. Tugging on the wire after tightening the screw not a good test. You might not be strong enough to pull the wire out of the hole. A loose connection will get hot and the insulation will burn away from the mechanical lug.

You can buy a ferrule lug. I think this is what you are referring to as a sleeve. Stick the wire in the ferrule. Crimp the ferrule. Then stick the ferrule in the mechanical lug.

Here is an example of a ferrule lug kit with a crimper:

Rokrou Ferrule Crimping Tool Kit HCS8 6-6A Wire Ferrule Crimper Tool AWG 23-10 Hexagonal Crimper With 1900PCS Wire Connectors Kit Seven Types 0.25-6mm² - - Amazon.com


Believe it or not, using a mechanical lug and a fine strand wire this is one of the hardest connections to make right. It is so difficult, that UL does not allow this type of connection to be made in an industrial environment.
Pat... You hit the nail on the head. I have a hex barrel crimper but unfortunately it is a 12 AWG-23 AWG IIRC. I know it can't handle the 8 AWG I'm messing with. Fortunately, I do have a different heavy duty battery cable crimper with adjustable heads that might work with a ferrule. This piece is usually used with HD raw copper ferrules, but is has a jaw setting for 8 AWG so we'll see.

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I'll try a test on a tinned copper sleeve, might also visit the big electrical supply place downtown, show them the wire and see what they suggest. All else fails, I can order a hex barrel crimper like you suggested but one that'll do 8 AWG wire.
 

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Ill take my chances with the crimp method, industry standard for as long as I can remember, since it was figured out that sweated fittings become brittle and break with vibration.
 

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You might consider using copper shim stock to wrap the wire into the ferrule. Really thin stuff. Then, use marine shrink tube over it (the stuff that has the melting adhesive.)
 
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