Team Camaro Tech banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I changed my tires to the original steel GM wheels a couple of weeks ago. One keeps going low, slowly. I loosened and retightened the stem. I am wondering if the wheel could have a leak? It runs straight and balanced easily so it is not damaged I assume.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,411 Posts
Gary,

Your best bet is to take it off the car and bring it to a tire repair facility that has a dunking tank. That way you can see exactly where it is coming from. If it wasn't really crazy busy in the shop I would walk a customer to the dunking tank where I worked back in the day and show him or her the leak. A leak could come from a variety of sources such as a rim leak, where the wheel weight is, around the valve stem, valve core, or a small pin hole in the thread that may need to be patched from the inside. If they are not brand new steel wheels and the wheels have some rust around the lip of the rim where the bead of the tire sits that will do it too.....

FWIW during my day I did not like Michelin's due to their propensity for rim leaks and it was much worse on Lincoln's & Cadillac's with aluminum rims (oxidation issues in the winter)or chrome plated wheels (also mostly in winter).

Good Luck and let us know how it goes!


SSG&H
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The only problem with the tank approach is the leak is very slow. But I will try it!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
32,358 Posts
Another at home trick is to fill the tire to max pressure on the sidewall and spray the tire, all of it including the valve stem, off the car, with window cleaner and look for tiny bubbles appearing. Slow leaks do appear after about 2-5 minutes. See the glob of bubbles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
Yes, small slow leaks can be hard to find. I they are unable to find the leak, I would have them install a new valve stem, clean the bead of the tire and the rim. Then they should put on bead sealer as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,217 Posts
Slime it.

http://www.slime.com/product_74_Tire_Sealant.html

I had a couple of tires that gave me fits. Sealed the beads, changed the stems, sprayed everywhere looking for the leaks. Finally put the green Slime in them. No more leaks..... :hurray:

Just put the valve stem at the bottom, let all the air out, put the slime in and air the tire back up, then drive it to make sure the slime is evenly distributed.

Non flamable, wont explode, washes out with water if necessary.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Well I found the leak with Windex. It is on the bead about 1" off of the weld seam on the wheel. I sure hope it is not the wheel. I would hate to have to weld it now that it is restored. I guess it could be worse. Thanks guys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
there are companies out there you can send it to and get it back just like it is supposed to be for around 150 bucks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,080 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Deflated it, cleaned in between the tire and rim. Now it is sealed just fine. I have never had this happen before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
A, this is my 500th post!!!!!!! I have seen this a few times on newer tires. Seems as if the manufactures have started to add a bar code on the bead, it sometimes it will cause a leak....
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top