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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally brought my Camaro home from the do-nothing body shop. I have already stripped it down to metal (almost a year ago) and now I think I am ready to start the body work. My question is whether to prime it now so it won't turn into a rust bucket and what kind of primer should I use? Would it be better to leave it bare metal? I have a fair amount of welding to do if that has anything to do with the answer. Also, I have zero body work experience so I am giving fair warning...I'll be back.
 

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I would advise giving the whole thing a good coat of Epoxy Primer (2 part system) over the bare metal - after it resanded, treated with a Phosphoric product like "Ospho" ( http://www.ospho.com/ ) and then rinsed, thoughly dried and 'tacked off'.
This will seal the metal and gaurd against any rust reforming during body repairs.
You are able to use fillers directly over these products.

I follow this procedure now and have had zero problems with rust reappearing since I started doing it.
 

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Ya, the best thing you can do is to go buy a gallon of DP90 and spray the whole body before it begins to flash-rust. You never wanna leave the metal bare any longer than necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay, thank you. If I try that 'leading process' described in the Eastwoods catalogue,I am guessing that I will need to take that area down to bare metal, right? There are very few small dents to deal with so it wouldn't be a problem. As far as welding the new patches in should I take the edges down to bare or is this like the 'weld through' primer people talk about? Once you answer these questions I will stay out of your hair for awhile. I will be back once I get this part of my education taken care of. Thanks to all for the help!
 

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I don't think you're into anyones hair at all - most of us on here are not professional painters and just do restoration type work.
Most of what we would recommend, we have do ourselves and know what to expect the outcome to be - sometimes it's refered to just as 'experience' ...

I don't know much about Eastwoods "Lead" process - but, I would stay away from any product that has 'lead' in it when doing body work with todays modern paints. There have been numerous issues with paint lifting and bleed through with these products.
Hopefully some of the 'pro' guys will see this post and give some input on this - I only 'know' what I've heard while sitting on one of the stools at the my favorite paint store listening to the other guys discuss paint problems and what I've read about it.
Todays modern body fillers are a far cry from the 'ol "Bondo" I grew up with (you know, back when 'lead' was cool ... ) Todays high quality fillers give a better reapir of small areas and seams and don't have any of the problems of the earlier products (except they will absorb moisture still ).
I am a big fan of "Evercoat"s 'Metal-2-Metal' product ( http://www.evercoat.com/productDetail.aspx?pID=37 ) :thumbsup:
This product works very well with reapirs on clean metal if you're doing panel replacement and filling seams. It also has a pleasing 'metal-y' look while you're working with it - so if your frinds come over they will see a metal-looking product on your project and not give you grief over using "Bondo" ;)

Yes, you will need to sand/grind back the primer from areas you are going to be welding on - it is Not a 'weld-through' product :noway:
It is always good practice to make sure any ajoining metal where you are installing a patch or panel be thoughly cleaned and fresh metal. Any rust, dirt, grease or paint will contaminate your welds and give youa crappy finish you'll need to rework.
You can spray a coat of one of the good weld through primer products along the edges of an area where it is going to take you a few days (or weeks ... ) to finish the alignment and welding of major panels. But, if it it is a small patch or panel you will finish in a day or two it isn't necessary. Remember - any of these 'weld-throughs' need to be thoughly removed BEFORE you do any further paint work or they will cause issues with the following coats.

For the small 'door ding' type work, I would recommend the "Rage Xtreme" product ( http://www.evercoat.com/productDetail.aspx?pID=146 ) also from Evercoat.
This product works very well right over the epoxy primer and gives and excellent finish to your product. It sands very easy and you will find it fills and feathers out better than much cheaper type fillers.
I use this product on all my final filling and smoothing of panels prior to sealer/primer before top coat.

Hope this helps, and some of the 'pro's' chime-in soon to set me straight if I've missed or mislead in some way;
John
 

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I think this question is inline is what deerhunter is talking about. If you are doing bodywork over the course of a few years and start exposing sections of metal or welding in non EDP coated panels, whats the best way to seal them up temporarily without doing a whole car DP90 coating?

Or should you DP90 in spots?
 

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MrA:
Don't want to hijack this thread and send it off in a new direction - it makes future searches for info muddy - but, here is one quick "search" result for 'EDP coating' - http://www.camaros.net/forums/showthread.php?t=67128&highlight=EDP+coating
I would recommend you do a couple searches using EDP, primer over EDP and others you think of to get some excellent past posts on the subject. Then feel free to start a new thread for more info if needed.
 
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