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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I went with the following size wheels and tires for my 1969 Camaro:

Front: 17x8 (4.75" backspacing) BFG G-Force 245/45-17
Back: 17x9.5 (5.5" backspacing) BFG G-Force 275/40-17

The fronts are perfect, no problems at all and lots of room. However the rears were close so I backed it out of my garage and over to a small incline in my driveway and as soon as the suspenstion started to compress my driver's side rear tire rubbed on the inside of the wheel well. Basically I could drive on a nice straight road with no pot holes all day but any kind of real driving in every day conditions and it's going to rub pretty easily.

So my question is, what can I do now? I would rather not replace the rear wheels if possible, so I am thinking of trying a 255 width tire on the rears to see what I get. Otherwise I will have to change the rears to a 17x8 I guess. Has anyone else tried a 255 on a 17x9.5" wheel? How does it look? Any pics would be great as well.

I don't think there is much else I can try but if anyone has any ideas let me know. My car has power drums all the way around and is lowered with Eibach Pro-Kit springs in the front (1.5" drop). The rear suspension is stock right down to the mono leafs.
 

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You could try a 1/4"ish wheel spacer if the inside of the tire is rubbing the inner wheelhouse. If that does the trick, consider appropriately longer wheel studs.

I have the same size wheels/backspace as you with 275's in the back without issue, so I'd try a few tricks before I gave up on them.
 

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Of course the 1/4" spacer is the easiest solution. Your screen name is "neverdone" is that true? If the inside of the wheel wells isn't painted you have some additional options. Where is the tire rubbing on the inside? Can you gain a little more room by "clearancing" (spelling and is that a word?) the inner wheel house? I'm not talking about taking a claw hammer and pounding away. I'm talking about taking a body man's dolly and a small sledge hammer and stealing a little room. If it's a realatively small spot sometimes you can flatten the area out and stretch the metal a little. Also look to see if the rear end is centered under the body. Is there the same amout of room on both sides? It one side tight on the inside and the other side tight on the outside? There might be room to gain there also. Don't rush out to buy new tires and or wheels or both until you explore all your options. Good luck.
 

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I had the same problem, added a 1/4" spacer problem solved. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I was able to work the wheel well a little and that helped, although it does still touch a bit. It only hits now if the suspension is completely compressed on one side or the other. I put blocks under the right rear and then lowered it down to check this. Did the same for the left side as well. Both will touch but just a bit. I think it might be OK for now. I am going to try a spacer just to see what happens, but I think it might wind up to close to the lip.
 

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Hi,

Thanks for the replies. I was able to work the wheel well a little and that helped, although it does still touch a bit. It only hits now if the suspension is completely compressed on one side or the other. I put blocks under the right rear and then lowered it down to check this. Did the same for the left side as well. Both will touch but just a bit. I think it might be OK for now. I am going to try a spacer just to see what happens, but I think it might wind up to close to the lip.
Jack's comments above were spot on...as usual.;)

I too am surprised you are having issues with this combo...but that just once again proves that these cars are all different.:yes:

First things,check to see how centered your rear axle is,I've seen up to 1"+ difference from one side to the other.Secondly,you should have a pretty good margin of room towards the outer fenders,correct?I would recommend using the 1/4" or 3/16" spacer that is offered @ Jeg's/Summit,or any good local tire shop.Doesn't sound like much...but you'll be amazed that those just might do the trick.Worked for me when I was running that same setup w/285/40's.:yes:..and keep in mind that under normal driving,you will not experience a completely compressed suspension,it's only steep driveways and culverts that will cause you any issues,that's where the spacers come into play.
If your suspension is in good working order,you shouldn't have any outward issues using these spacers.Good luck and report back.
 

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Had the same problem. Spacers are nice, but when they're not enough, and when rolling your fender sounds as painful as rolling your ankle :), give this a shot.

Make sure you have good rubber, or poly... for your rear suspention, especially the rubber bushings in the shackles. Jack the car up, but not on the rear axle. Remove the rear wheels, and inspect. Sounds to me like your rear end needs to scoot about a 3/4 of an inch to the drivers side. remove your shocks, loosen the u bolts, and loosen the front perch for your leaf springs, should be 3 bolts on each. I was able to use a piece of wood and a big hammer to smack the pumpkin and correct my problem. Mark the rear end just before a u bolt with a piece of chalk or something to see if your mightly swings are making any progress. Also, invest in a good rear stabilizer... made a world of difference in mine as far as rubbing in turns...
 

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Man people try to complicate things to much around here. He already said it rubs on both sides. When you suspension compresses it's normally from cornering or bumps. Bumps = fairly straight compression. Cornering= means a negative camber situation which means the tire will contact the inside wheel well or frame. Small spacer is absolutely the right option here.
 
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