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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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I built a battery box for a buddies 55 Chevy and below is a link to the work I did and how it was made:

http://good-times.webshots.com/album/562713425kMeNQe?start=120

On this battery box, I made my own bottom mounts welded level in the car and then built the box to bolt onto this section.
The box also has a welded in vent tube that is taller than the box and exits through a rubber grommet in the trunk floor.
The box also has an ANL fuse off of the battery to protect the wire off of the battery should it short.
This box will also have a battery tender inside of it so to recharge the battery later, all that has to be done is pull out the retractable reel cord from the underside of the car and plug it into a 110VAC outlet.

On the above link you can page forward to some other shots of the battery box being built and also the retractable 110VAC cord reel being built in with guide rollers.

I'm all for fusing the main power wire off of the battery with something like a 300A ANL fuse and then also running a dedicated ground wire from the battery up to the engine block or tranny. I don't like using the cars sheetmetal for anything but things like the taillights ground, headlight grounds, dome light ground, and so on.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow that is amazing. I guess it would help if i understood more about the voltage issues. That on and off switch you see in my trunk has a place for a fuse, but every time i put in a fues it just blows right away. Very nice work you did .
 

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Here's what I used. It's a Summit battery tray.
 

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Wow that is amazing. I guess it would help if i understood more about the voltage issues. That on and off switch you see in my trunk has a place for a fuse, but every time i put in a fues it just blows right away. Very nice work you did .
You will have voltage drops through connections and wire and ways to limit this is by making solid connections and running the proper sized wire.
It's hard to tell on your picture but on all but one car I've wired I have run 1/0 wire for main power from the battery to the starter and then if the car does not have a welded in roll cage I will run a dedicated 1/0 wire from the battery negative to the engine block or tranny. Then to tie the stuff to the car batterys ground I will either run another wire from the battery negative to the body of the car or one from the engine to the firewall.

As far as blowing fuses right away, then something is wrong. Knowing what size fuse and what is it wired to might help.

On your car you might be able to form a steel plate below the battery location and then run up some threaded rod to secure the battery solidly to the car. I hate seeing any batteries in trunks not encased in some type of enclosure. Even the sealed type optima's have pop off vents on them for a reason and I would still have one of those in an enclosure to help contain things if things were to go bad.

The 55 I have been working on with the battery box (and a lot of other things on it) is a long term project that MAYBE later this year will come together and get done.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #8
DSE bracket, behind trim cover



Wow this seems to be the way to go. I will look into getting this same Summit case. But is there a kill switch on this ? I don't see it ? Looks great, thanks.
 

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One of many setups. Here's the dual battery system with NHRA shutoff.


Heres the shutoff lever that's in the bumper bracket and doesn't make a visible hole that can't be closed up with something like a bolt.


Now here's 60 seconds ago. Note the switch is located at the rear now. The box satisfies the NHRA regardless of the Optima and the relay in front of the box insures that the primary cables are only hot during cranking.
Also the hot wire to the distribution bus is protected by a 60 amp fuse. It's black and hard to see. The wiring came from guys on this site.:yes:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
One of many setups. Here's the dual battery system with NHRA shutoff.


Heres the shutoff lever that's in the bumper bracket and doesn't make a visible hole that can't be closed up with something like a bolt.


Now here's 60 seconds ago. Note the switch is located at the rear now. The box satisfies the NHRA regardless of the Optima and the relay in front of the box insures that the primary cables are only hot during cranking.
Also the hot wire to the distribution bus is protected by a 60 amp fuse. It's black and hard to see. The wiring came from guys on this site.:yes:
Wow that's a great secret setup there !
 

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I'm trying to figure out where to mount my battery and realized through the above pics that the best place is on the passenger side (trunk mount).

How are you guys routing your cables up to the front of the car? Are you going inside the car, down the electrical tray under the sill plates and through the firewall at some place? Any help is appreciated.
 

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I'm trying to figure out where to mount my battery and realized through the above pics that the best place is on the passenger side (trunk mount). How are you guys routing your cables up to the front of the car? Are you going inside the car, down the electrical tray under the sill plates and through the firewall at some place? Any help is appreciated.
Here's mine, positive cable thru a rubber grommet and ground to the frame bumper bolt :)
If you need more pics or want specific area photos let me know :)

 

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I mounted the trunk the same direction as Fred has done. Less prone to plate damage upon acceleration, but then battery technology has improved since the install I did.

NHRA also requires min 3/8 bolts/holddowns for the battery to the frame/frame structure. I drilled through the rear rail and used the same all-thread for holding the tray to the floor, rail, and to hold the battery in the tray with a cross bar across the top.

Master ON-OFF switch on the rear panel, I wasn't concerned about street looks, and ran the cable through the pass sill trough, out the toeboard by the frame mount and over to the solenoid. Ground block to frame, body to frame and neg cable to roll bar rear bars. Should have ran a separate ground cable.

Also, NHRA requires either a sealed trunk or rear seat in place to keep battery acid in the trunk in case of explosion of battery.

If you have a mech reg alt, you should adjust for 13.5 volts at the battery to make up for the voltage loss through cable/connections. Or run your int reg alt 'sense' wire to the master off switch.

Master ON-OFF switch must do its job of killing the electrical system as required by NHRA. Tech Inspector can fail you if it doesn't. Dead engine, dead fuel pump, no sparks.

Some thoughts to think about.
 

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Wow this seems to be the way to go. I will look into getting this same Summit case. But is there a kill switch on this ? I don't see it ? Looks great, thanks.
Very nice & clean set-up you have here. Looks like you did a good job on the trunk. Would you tell me what is used for the backing or support of your panels in the trunk?
gene68ss
 

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Anyone care to share their philosophy on routing their cable? I plan to go inside the car, up the front on the passenger side under the sill plates, somehow get the positive over to the driver's side while under the dash, then use a bulkhead connector to get through the dash. Does this seem like a good idea? Should I route the + and - this way and use two bulkheads through the firewall?

Also, I've been searching everywhere for a bulkhead connector that has multiple terminals so I can grab power to connect to the fuse block. Has anyone ever heard of something like this?
 
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