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Since the mat was part of an rpo it was cut and installed by GM. To my knowledge there was only one mat and it got hand cut when installed in a convertible. I've been wrong before though!!
 

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Actually, for 1969 there was FOUR separate mats!! Depending on the body style (Coupe -vs- Convertible), and if the Space Saver was used.

Here are the numbers:

Coupe (W/O Space Saver) P/N 8738793
Coupe (With Space Saver) P/N 8738795
Conv (W/O Space Saver) P/N 8738794
Conv (With Space Saver) P/N 8738796

67 and 68 also had separate part numbers for the Coupe -vs- Convertible and "Collapsable Spare". 67 Even had a separate listing for the "Deluxe" interior!

Ed
 

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Those are service part numbers for the mats carried by the GM Service Deptartment. No doubt these have (had) the proper cut outs for the spare tire hold downs (they are in different locations for coupes and convertibles), and for the convertible shakers. GM could expect owners to be smart enough to cut the mats properly when they got home. The original trunkmat was probably a single part number and cut by the line worker responsible for finishing out the trunk. Probably the guy that put the spare tire, and jack in the trunk.
 

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Mark,

Not disputing your comments, but I find it VERY difficult to believe that Chevrolet would go through the process and expense of designing, tooling and manufacturing four separate trunk mats (after the fact) just for "service replacements"! Chevrolet is consistant with doing just the OPPOSITE!! And that's selling a "one size fits all" product. (Of course, these weren't manufactured by Chevrolet, but by a supplier, however, it's an expense that need not be incurred.) Especially after the model year had been completed. I really can't see them going through this much "bother"! IF and WHEN a customer wanted to purchase a replacement trunk mat (if ever), they would have just supplied ONE basic mat and the customer would have to cut it to fit. Chevrolet wasn't concerned that the customer couldn't "handle the job"!!

Of course, I've been wrong LOTS of times in the past, so I bow to your comments!!

:D

Ed
 

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I just went through the same type of issues as this with JohnZ offline. There has never (ok very rarely) been a part number in the GM parts catalogs that matches the numbers in the various Assembly Manuals and I always beleived it was because the parts called out in the AIM's were assemblies of various parts that are listed in the P&A catalogs that were already put together by some unknown group for the guy on the line to bolt into a car body as it came down the line. Actually it is 100% opposite. The part numbers that are listed in the AIM are the part numbers of a specific component of a car. These are based on the original engineering specifications and requirments for whatever the part was.

Remember Chevrolet's main reason for existance is to build cars.

Take for example the part number for a 69 steering center link in UPC9. It has a single part number but it contains the center link, tie rods, idler arm and steering gear arm. The original manufacturer of this component made it and assembled it in his factory to the requirements of the engineering drawing that was associated with this part number.

The Service department of GM decided which of these components it wanted to carry as service parts, in this car the tie rod ends, coupling sleeves, steering arm, center link, and idler arm. It then assigned different part numbers to each piece and proceeded to order and stock the components individually. It was up to the service department to determine what parts it needed to carry. If you look up the part numbers for a Service center link you will find only one part number. There are at least 3 different centerlinks that were used in Camaro's, a base link, a heavier duty power steering centerlink, and a hardened centerlink used in 68 Z28's. The service department only decided to carry one of these (which I would guess is the heavy duty power steering link) as they determined through black magic and voodoo that there would not be a large demand for 3 different centerlinks and that one of the three would do the job. So if you had a base, manual steering 6 cyl 69 camaro that needed a new centerlink you got the heavy duty power steering link as a replacement.

Another example is a Fender. You would think it was a pretty simple thing and they are all the same, but they aren't. The part number in the AIM is for just the outer skin. There is an inner structural part that carries a separate number. Neither of these two part numbers had any type of coating on them when they were delivered to the assembly plant, they were just bare galvanized steel. The two halves were joined at the factory on jigs and spotweled per the instructions in the AIM so that they all fit the same. If you order a front fender from GM, it won't carry the same part number specified in tha AIM and it already comes assembled and has a primer coat on it to keep it from rusting. Thats because it's a service part and the service department had the individual pieces assembled and primed, as part of their specification for that part number.

That's the original part number vs Service part number theory in a nutshell.
 

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Mark,

I agree with about 99 percent of what you say! As a matter of fact, your comments regarding the Center Link, and the service dept deciding to carry only one part (when there was actually three), confirms what I stated about the FOUR trunk mats!! Why would they decide to carry only one center link but supply FOUR trunk mats!!! The same thing applies to the Master Cylinder. Chevrolet decided to incorporate several Master Cylinders into one "replacement" part for multiple usage. I can't believe that they would be so unconcerned about the safety of the braking system by incorporating all these Master Cylinders, but so concerned that the customer might screw up installing the trunk mat, that they went with four!! See my point?

Isn't this fun!!! What the heck were they thinking??? Why does this stuff drive us so NUTS!!! Why should I really care??? Heck, a trunk mat is a trunk mat is a trunk mat... AGGGGGGG...

:confused:

Ed
 

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Originally posted by [email protected]:
Mark,

The same thing applies to the Master Cylinder. Chevrolet decided to incorporate several Master Cylinders into one "replacement" part for multiple usage. I can't believe that they would be so unconcerned about the safety of the braking system by incorporating all these Master Cylinders, but so concerned that the customer might screw up installing the trunk mat, that they went with four!!Ed
Ed - The Service Engineers (who decided how they wanted to provide Service parts) didn't compromise safety (master cylinder example) in any way; they consulted with the Design Engineer, determined which parts would properly service the car (or a range of cars), consolidated multiple different production parts into a single Service part where possible to reduce carrying costs, and the Design Engineer signed off on the selected Service parts as meeting all Engineering and Safety requirements. Service parts weren't selected based on customers installing them - they were selected on the basis of how the dealer's technicians could handle the parts, with or without special tools, to best meet the needs of the customer. "Do-It-Yourself" maintenance wasn't a consideration, for legal reasons, and still isn't.
 
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