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Discussion Starter #1
Hey people! I've searched the threads and I've not found answers to the following questions. Any help is greatly appreciated. I am installing an LT1 camaro T56 circa 94-96 into my 1970 camaro. I bought the conversion kit from Bob Weir and have it all set up to use a hydraulic throwout bearing clutch setup. I bought a Mcleod 168 tooth steel flywheel, 11 inch clutch disc and pressure plate. Here are my questions:

1) I marred the pilot bearing a bit while installing it. It has a couple of scores across the front surface that go to the edge. I pressed it in so that it was flush with the inner surface of the crankshaft. Should I be worried that I scratched/scored it a little? It's not out of round and none of the actual bearings or races are damaged. My mechanic buddy said not to worry. Your thoughts?

2) The pressure plate bolts came with instructions that said to use ARP's special install Molly lubricant on the bolts and to torque the bolts to 62 ft. lbs. I've always just used blue loctite when installing a pressure plate, no lubricant. I installed the pressure plate bolts to 65 ft. pounds with blue loctite. I didn't have a way to keep the pressure plate from spinning while I torqued it so I just manned up and held it with one hand, while using the torque wrench with the other hand. Have I compromised the torque in any way buy using no lubricant and torquing it in this way?

3) When I've installed 4 speeds before (muncie, saginaw) I've always put a little grease on the tranmission input shaft (where it feeds into the pilot bearing), and on the area where the throwout bearing travels. In this case, I'm using a hydraulic bearing that stays in place where it contacts the input shaft. Is it necessary for me to grease this portion of the input shaft? I figured it wasn't necessary as it's a hydraulic bearing

4) It's a Borg Warner T56, cast in aluminum. It's used so it is a little dirty but not too bad. It just looks dirty compared to the brand new beautiful bell housing. I was considering painting the transmission, in a flat aluminum color. Any feedback on this? I've heard some say it doesn't dissipate heat as well when you paint it and that it's not needed but for asthetics. Has anyone else here ever painted their aluminum transmission case? If so, what did you use and how did you prep it. I was thinking hi temp VHT paint precedded by a thorough cleaning and metal etch. Any ideas?

Any feedback on any of these questions would be super helpful and anything else you can think I've missed. Thanks!
 

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1) I marred the pilot bearing a bit while installing it. It has a couple of scores across the front surface that go to the edge. I pressed it in so that it was flush with the inner surface of the crankshaft. Should I be worried that I scratched/scored it a little? It's not out of round and none of the actual bearings or races are damaged. My mechanic buddy said not to worry. Your thoughts?

The front of the pilot bearing doesn't contact anything so scratches there won't matter. Make sure there are no raised edges on the ID of the bearing.

2) The pressure plate bolts came with instructions that said to use ARP's special install Molly lubricant on the bolts and to torque the bolts to 62 ft. lbs. I've always just used blue loctite when installing a pressure plate, no lubricant. I installed the pressure plate bolts to 65 ft. pounds with blue loctite. I didn't have a way to keep the pressure plate from spinning while I torqued it so I just manned up and held it with one hand, while using the torque wrench with the other hand. Have I compromised the torque in any way buy using no lubricant and torquing it in this way?
The front of the pilot bearing doesn't contact anything so scratches there won't matter. Make sure there are no raised edges on the ID of the bearing.

I would have installed the pressure plate with blue loctite also. Did you use an alignment tool for the clutch disk when you were tightening the pressure plate?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Okay, cool! Yeah, the front of the barring has like to slight indentations that run from edge to edge of the front. Other than that it's good. I did use and alignment tool for the clutch disc. I basically just shoved it into the pilot bearing, eyeballed the alignment tool to get it center in the pressure plate fingers and then checked to make sure that it was even around the edges of the clutch disk. I don't know how critical it is for this to be absolutely centered. Is it perfectly centered? Probably not, but looks pretty good to me. I also used loctite on the pressure plate. Overkill?
 

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So, I am working on a T56 swap also, but with an ls1 trans.
The torque stuff all sounds good.

What interests and confuses me is that the lt1 uses a pull style clutch because the bellhousing and input shaft is shorter. It also uses an odd throw out bearing, clutch fork, and slave cylinder combination.

The ls1 uses a hydraulic throwout bearing, which is for a regular push style clutch.
 

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On #3, you do not put any grease on the pilot bearing. It's got high temp grease in it and the o-ring is supposed to seal it once the input shaft goes in to keep dirt and dust out. If you put anything on it at all I believe it is supposed to be that clear high temp brake caliper grease.

Also, I'd grease the input shaft splines and the area where the throwout bearing rides. Typically, the to bearings come greased but you know it does ride on a spinning shaft.....

It's pretty hard to get the clutch disc dead center. No problem. If you can't get the trans to go in all the way (stops 1/4" out or so), you just snug the bolts up to hold the trans in place and actuate the clutch pedal. It'll disengage the plate and let the trans slide in. Of course, you've got to get that stuff hooked up so you can do it.
 

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400 bird, what adapter are you using? Staying hydraulic? Looking for the best/cheapest route to install mine.
 

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Stock bell, used mcleod adapter and mechanical linkage.

I shopped for a long time and added everything 5 times, the stock linkage is cheaper for me.
But I have a Pontiac block, the bellhousing bolt pattern is different.
With a chevy engine, the ls1 bellhousing will work, and then the hydraulic linkage may be less expensive.

For a pontiac block my only option to use a scatter shield which added a lot to the cost.
 
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