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I finished my camaro and just like most gearheads I had to start a new project it is
a 55 f100 with camaro clip and rear . I bought a 1988 chevy truck for the engine and tranny I have been told to go to painless wiring for the hook up what do you guys think and or should I keep the orginal computer and wiring if so how hard is it to put in
 

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Anyone know when 4L60-E transissions came out? I think it was in 1992. An 88 transmission should not be an electronic version. Should only have a lock up converter. Thats not worth installing the computer for. The lockup enable is pretty simple. You need a 12V ignition source through a brake switch. The brake switch will unlock the converter when you come to a stop (lest ye engine stall). The internals are wired a variety of ways, but essentially you want the TCC solenoid wired in series with the 4th clutch switch. One step better is to purchase an adjustable vacuum switch and put it in series with the circuit. It should be adjusted to drop the converter out when the manifold vacuum drops below some value (depending on the motor, cam etc.) I think Jet performance sells them. As for painless, I can't say yes or no. You just need an OEM style conector to go into the transmission. Beyond that, it's your choice. See what Jet Performance has to offer.

-dnult
 

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I guess it would depend on if you are going to keep the TBI and how much you are going to modify the engine. If you have 1227747 ECM computer and want to try your hand at burning proms you've got a good setup. There is a lot of information about the '747, how it works, and how to modify A/F, Timing, and diagnostics available on the web. There is also freeware and shareware available to help you make the mods. Take a look at http://www.diy-efi.org/gmecm/ and http://www.diy-efi.org/gmecm/papers/tunetip.html.
 

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I was only thinking transmission on your original post and didn't consider the EFI system as Torch did. The only difference to my instructions above would be that the ECU provides a torque converter feed. The computer will delay converter engagement when the engine is cold and control load shifting. As a result, there will be no need for the vacuum switch as I had suggested if you use the stock ECU to support your EFI system.

-dnult
 

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<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hottrodd1:
On the question, when did the 4L60E come out. If I am thinking right it was 1994.


Jerry
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

My manual only goes back to 92, but here is what I can decipher. Although the 4L80-E and 4T60-E were around in 1992, the first 4L60-E didn't show up until 1993 on various pickups. In 1994, the 4L60-E was found on most cars including Camaro and Corvette.

-dnult
 
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