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Discussion Starter #1
Well, maybe not, but its starting to feel that way!

For my big Aeromotive pump, I have 12V coming from the battery. The computer feeds a "key on" signal to an aeromotive pump controller, which in turn primes the pump at key on. It also varies the pump speed based on an RPM threshold, so it has a tach input as well.

I've also added a Ford oem collision trip switch, which kills the signal to the controller in the event of a collision. I also have a relay feed by a negative kill switch from the alarm so that if the alarm is trigged, it kills the pump feed.

Lots of wiring :)

- Dave
 

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Sounds like you've done a goodly amount of thinking ....and wiring.

Did you make a schematic for future reference? It always helps. Memories don't get any better with age.

FWIW, I would have installed the collision switch into the pump power feed, not the controller, providing the switch can handle the current load. Controllers are electronic and can break in the 'on' mode. This way by wiring the coll sw into the pump power feed, there is a definite break in power.

Now, power goes to controller with 'key on.' What happens in the START position? Or does the ECM take car of this function? I take it this power system is for the 69 MPFI?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm not morally certain, but I think the Ford collision switch I am using is intended for pre-relay. At least the connectors are quite small, I wouldn't expect to run 30 amps through them.

The controller is electronic, but its solid state, so its not like a relay that would stick. You're right, though, conceivably it could somehow fail in the ON position.

The ECM handles the trigger, and as far as I know, isn't aware of the cranking state, so I assume it provides power during run and crank. Odds are even if it didn't, there'd be enough fuel pressure residiual in the system to fire the injectors during crank...

Factory setups generally prime and then wait for oil pressure, so there's always a brief second or two during cranking before oil pressure comes up, and they seem to handle that ok.

Yes, this is for MPFI on the '69.
 
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